Skip navigation

Tag Archives: view

by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kohala Mountain Road, Kohala Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Kohala Mountain Road

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Through the ironwood forests on the Kohala Mountain Road, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Highway 250, the Kohala Mountain Road, is the direct, over the mountain connection from Waimea to the towns of Hawi and Kohala through the heart of ranching country. Cresting at over 3500 feet on Kohala Mountain, this almost 22-mile long road is one of the most scenic, but least driven, on the island.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Looking from Kohala Mountain to Mauna Kea, Kohala, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Known for its panoramic views, its thick, drifting mists punctuating long, sunny days and wide open spaces separated by ironwood forests, the Kohala Mountain Road packs a lot of spectacular scenery characterized by ceaselessly changing moods in its short run. If you are traveling to the north end of Hawaii Island, this road is a highly-recommended scenic drive.

There is a scenic turnout, way above Kawaihae Town down on the coast, about 6 miles out of Waimea that should not be missed; it has one of the most commanding views in all Kohala. Sunset views of Haleakala on Maui and the Kohala Coast are especially fine from this turnout.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Fence line along Kohala Road, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Offering spectacular views of Kohala, Mauna Kea and Hualalai Volcanoes, the Kohala Coast, forest and prairie, the Kohala Mountain Road leaves Waimea Town on its western margin at Lindsey Road. About a mile north out of town, the Kohala Mountain Road branches east (uphill) from the Kawaihae Road (Route 19), which runs down to the coast at Kawaihae Town. Coming from Hawi, take the main road north out of town, Hawi Road, from its intersection with the Akoni Pule Highway (Highway 270); from Kohala, take Kynnersley Road north from its intersection with Union Mill Road and the Akoni Pule Highway.

From a scenery standpoint, this road is beautiful going either direction, but is absolutely breath-taking headed south to north. There are no services of any kind between Waimea Town and Hawi.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Rainbow and Kohala Coast from Kohala Mountain Road, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kawaihae Harbor from Kohala Mountain Road on a perfect Blue Hawaii Day--you cannot see where the sky begins or the ocean ends: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

At Tour Guide our goal is to insure you have the most fun, most interesting and enjoyable vacation here in Hawaii–that you are provided with all the information you need to decide where to go and what to see, and that you are not burdened with out-dated or incorrect information.

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Big Sky Views from the Enchantingly Scenic Kohala Mountain Road, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kohala Mountain Road showcases the ranching heritage of the Big Island of Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan1

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.



Advertisements

by Donnie MacGowan

Looking Across Kilauea Iki to Halema'uma'u Eruption; The Kilauea Iki Trail Can Be Seen Etched Across the Floor of the Crater: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Looking Across Kilauea Iki to Halema'uma'u Eruption; The Kilauea Iki Trail Can Be Seen Etched Across the Floor of the Crater: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Hawaii is, in fact, an island that is served by very few roads, that many people come to visit each year and that makes most of its wealth from the tourism industry.  Given this, it’s quite surprising how hard it can be to find useful, reliable and up-to-date information about anything from “is your favorite restaurant still in business” to “how’s the snorkeling this month?”.

A Morning Glimpse of Mauna Loa Behind Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A Morning Glimpse of Mauna Loa Behind Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Road names are in the unfamiliar Hawaiian language; friendly locals give helpful directions, but in rapid-fire pigeon English using landmarks unfamiliar to the visitor and many guidebooks are either woefully out of date or flat wrong. The first time visitor to Hawaii may be overwhelmed when bombarded by advertising disguised as visitor information, overzealous salespeople from rapacious time-share resorts and racks and racks of of advertising for tours, attractions and restaurants.

Looking Down From the Rim of Kilauea Iki Crater as Hikers Cross the Floor of the Lava Lake: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Looking Down From the Rim of Kilauea Iki Crater as Hikers Cross the Floor of the Lava Lake: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Even the experienced Hawaii traveler may find it difficult to ferret out the information he needs to find a unique, secluded or unusual experience in Paradise.  Finding current, reliable information on hikes on the Big Island can be equally frustrating.

Misty View of Kilauea Iki Crater and Rainbow: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Misty View of Kilauea Iki Crater and Rainbow: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Clearly, the visitor to Hawaii can use some help finding special places in general and information about, and help getting to, the best hikes on Hawaii Island.

To help you find the more secluded, wild and exotic destinations in particular, and to help you get more out of your Hawaii vacation in general, Tour Guide Hawaii has released a brand new iPhone/iPod Touch App.  This “must have” travel app is packed with hours of informative video on the most interesting places on Hawaii; helps navigate you to all the most popular visitor destinations, the most interesting attractions, the most romantic and secluded beaches; helps you effortlessly find hikes, snorkel spots, historical and cultural landmarks, shopping and dining. And of course, our new App includes directions to, and rating of, all the public restrooms! Learn all about the App, here.

The Jumbled floor of Kilauea Iki Crater Lava Lake: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Jumbled floor of Kilauea Iki Crater Lava Lake: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

But first, let’s talk about what is arguably the finest short hike on the Island of Hawaii.

Kilauea Iki Crater Trail

Frank Burgess Along the Kilauea Iki Trail: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Frank Burgess Along the Kilauea Iki Trail: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Perhaps the finest short day hike in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park—and one of Hawaii Island’s best hikes, this four-mile, 2-3 hour trip climbs down into, across and back out of Kilauea Iki Crater. Crossing the crater floor on this surface provides one of the most interesting hikes in the Park. Looking up from the bottom of the crater, one can see the distinctive “ring around the crater” marking the high point of the lava lake during the last eruption. The four mile loop-hike descends from the rim in two places and crosses the crater floor in about three hours hiking at a nominal pace, giving one an intimate feel for volcanoes, Hawaiian-Style.

Along the Kilauea Iki Crater Rim Trail: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Along the Kilauea Iki Crater Rim Trail: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Along one side, thick fern and ohi’a forest skirts along the rim and on the other, lush tropical rainforest crowds to the very brink of the crater; bleak volcanic desert lines the crater walls and covers the floor. The start and finish of the hike are along well marked, wide trails following the rim with handrails and stairs in some spots as you begin to descend into the crater. The remainder is an easily followed, well marked trail with stone ahu (cairns) over the crater floor.

Pu'u Pua'i From Kilauea Iki Crater Rim Trail: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Pu'u Pua'i From Kilauea Iki Crater Rim Trail: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The hiker should keep their eyes open for Pele’s Hair and Pele’s Tears (fine, thread-like and bead-like deposits of volcanic glass), gaseous vents and other marvels of the living lava mountain. Bore-hole measurements taken in 1988 indicated that roiling molten lava was lying only 230 feet beneath the skin of the caldera at that time; today it is unknown what amount of liquid may be left, but the temperature just a couple hundred feet beneath your hiking boots is in excess of 1000 degrees.

On this hike you should take plenty of water, light rain gear, suncream, a map and compass. In addition, you should wear sturdy hiking shoes or boots and be in fairly good physical condition. As always when hiking in the Park, it is wise to avoid the noonday sun, and to remember that afternoon showers are common, especially along the crater rims. Remember that the start and finish of this hike are at an elevation of over 4000 feet…take it easy and enjoy the incredible views.

Looking Straight Across Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Looking Straight Across Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A video about this hike is available here.

Looking Out of the Forest Across Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Looking Out of the Forest Across Kilauea Iki Crater: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general, hiking the Big Island in particular, or about our new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com. For information about the author, please go here.

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan.  All rights reserved.

Kilaue Iki Crater and Trail from Pu'u Pua'i Overlook: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Kilauea Iki Crater and Trail from Pu'u Pua'i Overlook: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan