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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Punalu'u Black Sand Beach Graphic: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Punalu’u Black Sand Beach Park/Kaneele’ele Heiau/Kaimu Beach

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Bradford MacGowan Filming at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A truly remarkable place of great peace, beauty and spiritual healing, Punalu’u’s black sand-lined coves and beaches are world-renowned.  Dozens of endangered Hawai’ian Green Sea Turtles swim the waters frequently basking on the beach here.  The wildness of the ocean and the serenity of the freshwater fishpond and coconut palm-shaded beaches make this an ideal place to spend some soul-recharge time.  Snorkeling, picnicking and camping, or just relaxing on the beach, are major destination pass-times here.  Near South Point and between the villages of Na’alehu and Pahala, Punalu’u is on Highway 11 between mile markers 55 and 56.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Looking back at Punalu'u Beach From the ruins of the Pahala Sugar Company wharf, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Punalu’u means “springs you swim to”; it is the abundance of these fresh water springs just offshore that makes swimming at Punalu’u so cold and this settlement site so important to the ancient Hawai’ians.  In pre-contact times, due to the scarcity of fresh water along the Ka’u coast, Hawaiians would swim out into Kuhua Bay with stoppered gourds, dive down on top the springs, unstopper the gourds and, by upending them underwater, fill them with the fresh spring water emanating from the floor of the bay.  These springs are one of the very few sources of fresh water on this entire end of the island.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Edangered Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle emerges from the ocean at Punaluu Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo By Donald B. MacGowan

Dozens of Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles make the waters and beaches around Punalu’u their home; it is one of the few places outside the French Frigate Shoals in the NW Hawaiian Islands where they breed and lay eggs. Called Honu by Hawaii’s natives, they are beautiful, serene and seeming wise. Though they have swum the oceans for over 200 million years, peacefully feeding on algae and invertebrates, this highly successful product of amphibian evolution is in grave danger.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Honu, the Haaiian Green Sea Turtle at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Loss of habitat, hunting and molestation by humans has conspired to push them to the very verge of extinction. Protected now by state and federal law, the population of once millions of honu has been decimated to just a few hundred thousand.  Although they are making a comeback, Hawaii’s honu are still very much endangered.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Visitors are charmed by a Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle, Honu, at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Do not approach basking turtles closely, never touch or pick them up; stay at least 30 feet from them if they are basking on shore. Harassing turtles carries a stiff fine and in any case, touching the turtle is a good way to get a raging salmonella infection. If honu are swimming near where you are, do not approach or chase them; always swim to the side of them, never above (as a predatory shark would) nor below them (so they won’t feel that their soft belly is at risk).

aniNew at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Turtle tracks in the black sand beach at Punalu'u, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Anyone who observes their beauty and grace underwater easily understands why the Hawai’ians base their word for “peace”, “honua”, on their name for the green sea turtle, “honu”.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Reflection in the brackish ponds behind Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The large brackish pond behind the beach, once a very productive fish-growing pond, is also fed by a large spring called Kawaihu O Kauila (literally, “the overflowing waters of the Turtle Goddess, Kauila).  This spring is also where the mythical figure Laka slew the fierce, man-eating mo’o (sea serpent) Kaikapu (“forbidden water”).  There are some very, very mixed breed ducks that make this pond their home.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kane'ele'ele Heiau and Ninole Cinder Cone above Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

On the hill just south of the beach behind the pier is Kaneele’ele Heiau, which also is called Mailekini Heiau.  This temple very worth visiting but is often overlooked and not noticed by causal visitors simply because of its extreme size.  The heiau, standing on the hill overlooking the ruins of the pier and warehouse, is comprised of a stone platform no less than seven hundred feet long and five hundred feet wide.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kane'ele'ele Heiau looking west toward Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The name, meaning “darkness of the father god”, coupled with the heiau’s massive size, lends credence to the local legend that this was once the luakini heiau, or place of human sacrifice, of some importance for this district. A large sacrificial stone (now removed) outside the entrance, and bone pits discovered on the temple grounds during construction of the pier and warehouse, point to this as well.  Kaneele’ele is thought to represent two heiaus constructed end-to-end; Punalu’u Nui in the north and Halelau in the south.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Section of Hawaiian paved trail between heiaus at Punalu'u Black Sand Beach: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

West of the parking lot, above Ninole Cove, stand tumbled walls, all that remains of Ka’ie’ie Heiau.  Bordering the a’a lava flow, this temple once presided over a large fishpond that was destroyed by the a’a flow.

Other ruins in the park include the historic ruins of the Pahala Sugar Company Wharf and Warehouse, alongside Kuhua Bay.   After the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor at the outset of World War Two, the Army destroyed the wall and pier facilities so the Japanese couldn’t use them to land on Hawai’i’s unprotected southern side.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Punaluu Sun Bathers in dulge themselves on the gorgeous black sand at Punalu'u Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The beaches and land immediately adjacent to Punalu’u Harbor, Ninole Cove and Kuhua Bay are all part of the County Beach Park.  Snorkeling at Punalu’u is cold due to the number of off-shore springs and a bit weird (the black sand bottom makes the water dark even on the brightest days), but very rewarding, considering the density of sea turtles in the bay.   Strong off-shore winds, ocean currents and a fearsome rip mean swimmers and snorkelers should use caution and stay near shore when swimming at Punalu’u, but it’s hard to resist getting in with all those turtles.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Punalu'u Camping--although exposed to the elements, you cannot beat the view, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Camping is permitted around the pavilions and is by permit only. Pitching camp here can be a windy, but wild and elemental, exercise in campcraft. Due to the exposed nature of the terrain, however, there is little privacy.

Available services include water, picnic tables, restrooms, electrical outlets, and pavilions, parking; camping by permit only.  During peak tourist time, there is a souvenir stand with some packaged food items and canned drinks for sale.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The black sand is not only geologically delicate, it's in finite supply--please don't take it home with you; Punalu'u Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Punaluu Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

At Tour Guide our goal is to insure you have the most fun, most interesting and enjoyable vacation here in Hawaii–that you are provided with all the information you need to decide where to go and what to see, and that you are not burdened with out-dated or incorrect information.

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand, available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Punaluu Black Sand Beach, Ka'u Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Aerial Photo of Pu'ukohola, Pu'u Maile and Pelekane Bay, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pelakane Beach near Hale O Kapuni, Pu'ukohola National Historic Park, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Park

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pu'ukohola in the sunset, Kohala Coast Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

The fulfillment of an ancient prophecy, the devotion of a powerful young King and the first steps toward a new kingdom; the temple at Pu’ukohola stands a mute testament to the facts of Hawaiian history that read like the most dramatic of legends. Forever brooding seaward, Pu’ukohola is an enormous temple inspired by a god-sent vision of greatness. Kamehameha built Pu’ukohola on top of its eponymous hill at Mailekini, in fulfillment of the prophecy by Kaua’i kahuna Kapoukahi. The prophecy foretold if Kamehameha built a great temple to his war god Ku, he would prevail in his wars of conquest and unite the Hawai’ian Islands. In or around the year 1791, perhaps as many as 20,000 people passing stones hand-to-hand 14 miles from Pololu Valley raised this massive Heiau.

When it was finished, Kamehameha invited his cousin and chief rival for the throne of Hawai’i, the Ali’i of Ka’u, Keoua, to the dedication. Some versions of the story tell that when Keoua arrived with a contingent of his Ka’u warriors, a scuffle broke out and he was killed by a spear thrown by the warrior Ke’eaumoku. Kamehameha had the rest of the Ali’i in Keoua’s party seized and they were made the first sacrifice at the new temple.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Mauna Kea from Pu'ukohola National Historic Park, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Another version of the story tells that Ke’eaumoku took hold of Keoua and ducked him into the sea; as a result, Keoua drowned. This account contends that Keoua was not killed by a spear because Kamehameha believed there should be no blemish on the body of Keoua for the consecration of the temple to Ku.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Brooding Seaward, Pu'ukohola looms over Kawaihae Harbor, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Yet another version of the story holds that Keoua was in fact shot and killed by the Brits John Young and Isaac Davis, from somewhere below Mailekini Heiau. This story contends that this is how Pelekane Beach, which means “British Beach”, got its name. All accounts agree that because of the ease with which the Ali’i had been captured and sacrificed, all the rest of Keoua’s party were spared.

After long years of fierce battle and earnest negotiation, in 1810 after having united the islands by force or agreement, and having fulfilled the prophecy, Kamehameha became the first ruler of the united Hawai’ian Islands.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Looking Down Onto Pelakane Beach From Near Mailekini Heiau, Pu'ukohola National Historic Park, Kohala, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Pu’ukohola is the largest stone structure in Hawaii, not counting the modern rock wall in front of the Kailua Lowe’s Hardware store.

Below Pu’ukohola and Mailekini lies Pelekane Beach at the mouth of Pelekane Gulch. Submerged just offshore between here and the Kawaihae Harbor jetty, are the largely unexplored, ruined remains of Hale O Kapuni Heiau, a temple dedicated to the shark god Mano. Here worship rites included human flesh being fed to sharks. One reason this temple is not better known is that the bay is still home to several large tiger sharks.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Overlooking the Site of the Submerged Hale O Kapuni Heiau from Near Mailekini Heiau to the Kawaihae Jetty, Pu'ukohola National Historic Park, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A full range of facilities exist at Pu’ukohola and the adjacent Samuel Spencer Beach Park. More about Spencer Beach Park can be found here.

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunrise on Pu'ukohola Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pu'ukohola Faded Sunset: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Moiokini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Whether you visit the Big Island for a few days, a couple weeks or a few months, you want to make the most of your time in Paradise. With such a wide variety of natural and commercial attractions, it is natural for the visitor to get a little overwhelmed in the “Option Overload” and not be able to make a balanced and informed decision on what they want to do and how best to spend their time.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kapakai Kokoiki (Kamehameha Akahi Aina Hanau) Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Even choosing which beach you want to spend time on, or where you want to hike can be an exercise in confusion and conflicting advice.  Clearly, visitors to Hawaii could use help making quality decisions about how best to spend their time.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Offerings Left at Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Tour Guide Hawaii is excited and proud to announce the release of their new GPS/WiFi enabled App for iPhone and iPod that helps you navigate your trip to Hawaii with hours of informative, location-aware video and information. Although our video guide will lead you to dozens of unusual, untamed and unspoiled spots, let’s look at a pair of important historical sights reached via a great hike, or a really good mountain biking trek, that you might have heard about, but might not be able to find from maps and guidebooks and could otherwise miss if you did not have Tour Guide Hawaii’s new App.

Kohala History and the Birthplace of King Kamehameha: Mo’okini Luakini Heiau and Kapakai Kokoiki (Kamehameha Akahi Aina Hanau) Heiau

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Holerhole Stone at Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Introduction: Have you ever been somewhere stark, impressive, primitive and ancient, that was able to raise the hackles on your neck? Mo’okini Heiau on the windswept northern tip of Hawaii Island is just one such place.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

A Windfarm on the Windswept Grasslands of Kohala, Near Mo'okini Heiau, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The history of Hawaii as a kingdom starts in the grasslands and jungle canyons of North Kohala at two prominent temples, or heiau, which were the respective foci of the swirl of great events and sweep of history that culminated in Kamehameha the Great’s creation of the Kingdom of Hawaii by conquering and uniting all the islands of Hawaii.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Windswept Grasslands Around Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

It was here in North Kohala, at Mo’okini Heiau, that a new religion was born. Passionate priests and princes from Tahiti reconstituted and revived the laws and society of Hawaii in the 11 and 12th centuries. New practices of religious worship were introduced and untold thousands of people were sacrificed at Mo’okini to worship a new god, the war god Kuka’ilimoku (also called “Ku”). Born nearby at Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau in about the year 1758, Kamehameha the Great was brought to Mo’okini for his birth rituals.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Approach to Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

History: During the 11th century, warlike Tahitians arrived in the Hawai’ian Islands, conquering, enslaving, sacrificing and largely displacing the descendants of the original Marquesan settlers. Into this bloody landscape came Pa’ao, the terrible and powerful Tahitian kahuna who was affronted at the lack of respect the Hawai’ian Ali’i commanded and at the apparent weakness of the Hawai’ian gods. He sent back to Tahiti for the warrior chief Pili and together they brought worship of the powerful war god Ku to Hawai’i and strengthened the kapu system of laws and power of the Ali’i.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Inside Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Worship of Ku demanded human sacrifice, which was performed at luakini heiau throughout the parts of Polynesia where Ku was venerated. Pa’ao caused Mo’okini Heiau (literally meaning “many lineages”) to be raised (it is said to have happened in a single night) by as many as 20,000 men passing stones hand to hand from Pololu Valley, 14 miles distant. During this process, if a stone was dropped it was left where it lay to preserve the rhythm of passing; the scattered line of dropped stones can be followed all the way back to Pololu to this day.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Inner Precincts of Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The alter stones were brought by war canoe from Pa’ao’s home heiau of Taputapuatea (lit. sacrifices from abroad), the most powerful and most feared heiau in Polynesia and the center of Ku worship. Boulders for cornerstones brought hundreds of miles across the sea from Taputapuatea were laid with sacrificed humans beneath them. This gave the heiau a formidable power and an air of menace and despair that clings to it to this day.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Offerings at Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Outside the heiau walls can be found a large phallic rock and a flat stone with a cup-like depression near the top. Here, on this holehole stone, the baked bodies of human sacrifices were stripped of flesh and the bones saved to be rendered into fishhooks and dagger blades. Not much mention of the fate of the human flesh from these sacrifices is made, but it is universally documented that Polynesians everywhere were cannibals. This is a topic that is sometimes difficult for the modern descendants of these people to come to terms with and one which is best, and most polite, to simply accept and not comment or speculate upon.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Framing for a hale pili (grass house) at Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There is no counting the tens of thousands of Hawai’ians who were made sacrifice here on this stone at barren, terrible Mo’okini over the centuries, but the sacrificial victims were all gathered by a class of kahuna called the Mu, or “body catcher”; the foundation of the dwelling of the Mu can still be found among the ruins of Mo’okini.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

One of the Great Wals at Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Well preserved, Mo’okini Heiau stands today at the north end of Hawai’i, the first temple of human sacrifice in Hawai’i and the first site in Hawai’i to be preserved as a National Historic Landmark under the Historic Sites Act of 1935. Mo’okini Heiau is now part of Lapakahi State Historic Park. As Mo’okini is an active Heiau, visitors are reminded to stay away if religious observances are being celebrated.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kamehameha Akahi Aina Hanau Heiau at Kapakai Kokoiki, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Four tenths of a mile past Mo’okini is the unlikely, lonely and windswept site of fulfillment of a long-standing prophesy amongst the ancient Hawai’ians, Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau, now named Kamehameha Akahi Aina Hanau. Long-foretold was the coming of a warrior king who would unite all the islands into a single kingdom and who would rule wisely, piously and long. Prophecy and legend held that this Ali’i would be terrible in his fierceness, unstoppable in his strength, just in his laws and faithful in his observances to the gods. The prophecy continued that the ruler would be born along the wild northern coast of Hawai’i, the most sacred of the Hawai’ian islands. This ruler would, according to the prophecy, wield power of proportion unknown to previous Hawai’ian Ali’i, but for all this destined greatness, he was prophesied to live a lonely life.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Legendary Birthplace of Kamehameha at Kapakai Kokoiki, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Into this mythic context was born Kamehameha the Great, whose very name means “The Lonely One” in about the year 1758. The large boulders inside the enclosure at Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau are thought to be the same birthing stones on which Kamehameha’s mother, Chiefess Keku’iapoiwa, gave birth to the future ruler.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Hawaii Bureau of Tourism's Idea of a Good Joke, Mo'okini Heiau, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Getting There: To reach these impressive sites, turn off Highway 270 onto the Upolu Airport Road near mile 20 (just west of Hawi) and continue 2 miles to the airport. We recommend that you park in the obvious dirt car park by the airport and hike or mountain bike the road 1.6 miles to Mo’okini Heiau, continuing on a further 0.4 miles to Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau. It is possible to drive 4-wheel drive vehicles down this road, but deep ruts, potholes and rocks make it impassable for most passenger vehicles. Also, Kohala is infamous for its ferocious and unpredictable rainstorms which render this road an ordeal in deep oozing mud and slime, unusable to motorized vehicles.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Not far from Mo'okini Heiau is the Original King Kamehameha Statue in Kapa'a, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

This dirt road goes all the way (about 4 miles) past Mo’okini Heiau and the Kamehameha Birthplace to the old Coast Guard Loran Lookout; this makes a wonderful beginner’s mountain biking trip or day hike, especially considering the amazing historical sites along the way.

Retracing your path to the airport and back up to Highway 270, treat yourself to a visit in real Old Hawaii at the small towns of Hawi and Kapa’a. In these small towns you can find restrooms, many of the island’s best restaurants, interesting shops, fantastic art galleries and grocery stores.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sacred Stones at Mo'okini Heiau, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

UPDATE: A museum without a curator? It’s worse than a church without a preacher–worse than a library without a librarian or a bar without a bartender…who is going to take care of the collections? Make sure research specimens are preserved and returned after study? Who is going to preserve the present and coordinate growth for the future…who is going to provide leadership and vision for the museum?

Certainly not the boobs and cretins who came up with THIS plan.

It would be nice to think that the University was run by thoughtful, adult professionals who understood their jobs in general and the requirements of running a museum in particular…but NO, we get that boob Buchannan–who obviously would store his wife’s jewels in the shit house, judging by the idiocy of his plan. What complete nonsense and buffoonery.

Yes, Donnie, but do you have an OPINION about this?

Reprinted from here.

UW to Use Private Funds to Reopen Geological Museum to Visitors

July 18, 2009 — UW President Tom Buchanan has directed the University of Wyoming Geological Museum to reopen on Aug. 24 on a part-time basis for public visits.

The UW Foundation has identified and offered private funding to pay for security so the Geological Museum can be open to UW visitors through the coming academic year.

“I remain fully committed to meeting UW’s budget reductions and intend to achieve savings in our state appropriation from the museum’s operations,” UW President Tom Buchanan says. “I am grateful to the Foundation for providing the resources needed to keep the doors open to the public.”

The museum closed June 30 as one of a series of steps taken to meet an $18.3 million state budget cut that took effect July 1. Buchanan says UW administrators are working hard to minimize the impact of recent budget reductions on students, faculty, staff, the community and the state of Wyoming.

“The generous assistance of Vice President Ben Blalock and the UW Foundation will allow us to respond to concerns the museum would remain closed to alumni, tourists, school children and families. Although the museum will not be open on the same basis it was before July 1, this approach meets the most pressing desires for access articulated by the public,” Buchanan says.

Buchanan has initiated steps to identify a financially sound future for the museum and will direct a campus group to develop a plan for the display collection no later than the end of the fall semester. The plan will also address the extent to which the research and display collections can mesh with UW’s broader academic mission, especially in earth and energy sciences and in science education.

For more information call Jessica Lowell, (307) 460-0604.

Posted on Saturday, July 18, 2009

Help Save the University of Wyoming Geological Museum!!!

***UPDATE***UPDATE***UPDATE***UPDATE***UPDATE***UPDATE***

The Casper Star-Tribune has an online poll today to vote for either a full time, part time or closed Geological Museum. We all need to show the administration at the University of Wyoming what we think of their recent decisions. So head on over to the Casper Star-Tribune website and scroll half-way down the page and vote! Thanks!

So far, the vote is 93% in favor of having the Museum open on some basis, 5% in favor of closing and 3% in favor of turning the Museum into a skate park. In fact, the facetious answer of “turn it into a skate park” is statistically similar to those who want to close it!  Keep the pressure on the feckless UW Administrators who want to favor losing athletic teams over academic pursuits and the fanatic Religious Right who want the Museum closed on religious grounds

Add your voice, here!

ALSO: Remember to keep the letters to the Editor and to UW officials pouring in.  Email address available below, as well as here.

Don’t let the creationists, religious zealots, christards and intelligent design hoaxers win!  Express your opinion here: http://www.trib.com/

Previous Post:

The Administration of the University of Wyoming have decided to close the Geological Museum due to a funding shortfall. Despite continuing to lavish millions upon millions of tax dollars on a lack-luster-to-losing Division 1-A Athletic Program, the Administration has tried to reconcile this shameful misallocation of funding as loss of Bowl and television revenue, loss of tradition and loss of long-standing inter-collegiate rivalries.

Well wah-fucking-wah.

What about the 122-year tradition of excellence at the UW Geological Museum? What about the thousands upon thousands of primary, secondary and college students who annually come to the museum to have their curiosity nurtured, scholastic experiences enriched and their intellects stimulated? What about the hundreds and hundreds of families who visit the museum each year who otherwise would not come to Laramie and spend money in the local economy?

In fact, revenues from athletics does not come close to compensating the residents of the State of Wyoming for the millions and millions of tax dollars in real cost these programs suck in–just look at the waste of many millions in the new stadium sky boxes as just a single example. The details of this bait-and-switch deviousness can be found in the UW budget numbers (see for example here: http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=3672 and here: http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=11604) and the thinly disguised misinformation-as-rationale here (http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=11789#Revised).

If we can flush millions away on a robust, if dismally-performing, athletic program, can we not find a couple hundred thousand dollars to keep the successful and popular Museum funded?

Provost Myron Allen proposes his plans for the UW Geological Museum here (http://www.uwyo.edu/presidentsupport/outbox/2009/geology_museum_15_jun_09.pdf). Although a brilliant mathematician and otherwise decent guy, Dr. Allen’s proposal for closing the museum manages to be simultaneously short-sighted, amateurishly incomplete and maddeningly misleading.

In a personal e-mail, Dr. Allen assured me that Christian intolerance, religious superstitions and irrational creationist beliefs played no part in the closing of the Museum. However, a quick survey shows that such scientific illiteracy and non-reality-based belief systems are rife among many of the the UW Trustees as well as some Members of the Wyoming State Senate and House of Representatives; perhaps this explains the lack of vociferous opposition to this obscene and perverse misallocation of University resources.

The fact that, in this day and age, in this state, so many University Trustees, Senators and Congressmen do not understand the value of a Museum, the fundamentals of science nor even subscribe to any modern notion of science, underlines emphatically and exactly why this University has an absolute ethical responsibility and urgent need to keep this museum open.

Perhaps it is not possible for non-scientists (such as the UW President and Provost) to understand the importance of science museums, but science and technology only grow though fostering early interest in young students–this is done primarily through programs like the UW Geological Museum. Every time Drs. Buchannan or Allen listen to their iPod, check their schedules on their handheld, email their colleagues or microwave popcorn to eat while watching their plasma screen Televisions, perhaps they should stop and consider the enormous debt Americans pay daily to scientists and engineers developing and refining new technology to produce new products. Scientists and engineers who chose, and excel at, their professions precisely because as children they had access to, and were captivated by, programs such as the UW Geological Museum provides.

Or perhaps it is our job to remind Dr. Buchannan and Allen of their debt and responsibility to the future. Below are a list of the most essential people for you to contact and express your outrage at an institution that is willing to pour millions and millions and millions of tax dollars, year after year, into losing athletic programs that produce nothing, while letting a successful, brilliant and beloved academic program, such as the UW Geological Museum, die simply to save a couple measly hundred thousand dollars. It is clear to even the most casual observer that this is not in the best interests of the people of Wyoming, nor in the spirit of academic excellence to which UW claims to aspire, nor even in keeping with the simple recognition that these men are responsible for preserving for the future the best parts of the present at UW.

Drs. Buchannan and Allen, if allowed to carry through with this hideous misallocation of tax money, are failing miserably at all three tasks.

I am reminded of how Winston Churchill is reported to have once characterized a similar caliber decision: “Save us from the maliciously ignorant and the aggressively stupid!”

Write. Today. NOW. EVERYBODY ON THE LIST!

Sincerely and with hope-

Donald B. MacGowan, PhD

For MORE go here and here.

ADDRESSES:
Important UW email Addresses:
President of the University of Wyoming
Tom Buchannan
tombuch@uwyo.edu

Provost of the University of Wyoming
Prof. Myron Allen, Provost
allen@uwyo.edu

Chairman, Department of Geology and Geophysics
Prof. Art Snoke
snoke@uwyo.edu

State Geologist
Dr. Ronald C. Surdam
rsurdam@uwyo.edu

Governor of the State of Wyoming
Governor Dave Freudenthal
governor@state.wy.us

Letters to the Editor:
kerry.drake@trib.com

http://www.wyomingnews.com/our_services/letter_to_the_editor/

dthomsen@laramieboomerang.com

openforum@denverpost.com

University of Wyoming Trustees:
Jim D. Neiman
jimd@neiman.biz

Warren A. Lauer
warrenlauer@lauerlegal.com

Dave Bostrom
mba-db@mbawyoming.com

Dick Davis
dick@davisandcannon.com

Betty Fear
bfear@centurytel.net

Taylor Haynes, M.D.
rangebeef@aol.com

David F. Palmerlee
dpalmerlee@vcn.com

Bradford S. Mead
bradmead@wyoming.com

Ann Rochelle
arochelle@casperlaw.net

James Trosper
jltrosper@wyoming.com

Ex Officio Trustees:
Jim McBride
supt@educ.state.wy.us

Kelsey Day
asuwpres@uwyo.edu

Elected Officials:
Members of the Wyoming House of Representatives
Representative Rodney “Pete” Anderson
randerso@wyoming.com

Representative George Bagby
g.bagby@bresnan.net

Representative Joseph M. Barbuto
jbarbuto@wyoming.com

Representative Rosie Berger
rberger@wyoming.com

Representative Stan Blake
sblake@wyoming.com

Representative Dave Bonner, Jr.
dbonner@wyoming.com

Representative Bob Brechtel
bbrechtel@wyoming.com

Representative Kermit C. Brown
kermitbrown@wyoming.com

Representative Edward A. Buchanan
ebuchanan@wyoming.com

Representative James W. Byrd
jbyrd@wyoming.com

Representative Richard L. Cannady
rcannady@wyoming.com

Representative Seth Carson
scarson@wyoming.com

Representative Pat Childers
childers@wyoming.com

Representative Roy Cohee
roy@cytransportation.com

Representative Cathy Connolly
cconnolly@wyoming.com

Representative Bernadine Craft
bcraft@wyoming.com

Representative Kathy Davison
kdavison@wyoming.com

Representative Ross Diercks
diercks@wyoming.com

Representative Amy L. Edmonds
aedmonds@wyoming.com

Representative Ken A. Esquibel
kesquibel@wyoming.com

Representative Mike Gilmore
michaelgilmore@wyoming.com

Representative Keith Gingery
kgingery@wyoming.com

Representative W. Patrick Goggles
pgoggles@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Hales
mary.hales@realestateincasper.com

Representative Timothy P. Hallinan, M.D.
tphallinan@bresnan.net

Representative Debbie Hammons
dhammons@wyoming.com

Representative Steve Harshman
sharshman@wyoming.com

Representative Elaine D. Harvey
harvey00@tctwest.net

Representative Peter S. Illoway
pete_chloeilloway3@msn.com

Representative Allen M. Jaggi
ajaggi@wyoming.com

Representative Peter M. Jorgensen
pjorgensen@jorgensenassociates.com

Representative Jack Landon, Jr.
jlandon@wyoming.com

Representative Thomas A. Lockhart
tlockh1617@aol.com

Representative Thomas E. Lubnau, II
tlubnau@vcn.com

Representative Michael K. Madden
madden@wyoming.com

Representative Robert M. McKim
rmckim@wyoming.com

Representative Del McOmie
dwmcomie@bresnan.net

Representative Erin E. Mercer
emercer@wyoming.com

Representative Saundra Meyer
slmey@wyoming.com

Representative David R. Miller
repmiller@wyoming.com

Representative Lori Millin
lorimillin@bresnan.net

Representative Glenn Moniz
gmoniz@bresnan.net

Representative John W. Patton
johnpatton@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Peasley
fpeasley@wyoming.com

Representative Bryan K. Pedersen
bpedersen@wyoming.com

Representative Owen Petersen
opetersen@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Philp
fphilp@wyoming.com

Representative Lorraine K. Quarberg
lquarberg@wyoming.com

Representative Jim Roscoe
jroscoe@wyoming.com

Representative Mark A. Semlek
msemlek@wyoming.com

Representative Lisa A. Shepperson
lshepperson@wyoming.com

Representative Colin M. Simpson
csimpson@skelaw.com

Representative William “Jeb” Steward
jebsteward@union-tel.com

Representative Tim Stubson
tim@stampedeforstubson.com

Representative Matt Teeters
mteeters@wyoming.com

Representative Bill Thompson
billthompson@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Throne
mthrone@wyoming.com

Representative Sue Wallis
sue.wallis@vcn.com

Representative Dan Zwonitzer
dzwonitzer@wyoming.com

Representative David L. Zwonitzer
davezwonitzer@wyoming.com

Members of the Wyoming State Senate
Senator Jim Anderson
jamesda1@msn.com

Senator Eli D. Bebout
senbebout@wyoming.com

Senator Bruce Burns
bburns@dbburns.com

Senator Cale Case, Ph.D
ccase@wyoming.com

Senator Henry H.R. “Hank” Coe
hcoe@wyoming.com

Senator Stan Cooper
scooperwy@gmail.com

Senator Dan Dockstader
ddockstader@wyoming.com
Senator Floyd A. Esquibel
fesquibel@wyoming.com

Senator Gerald E. Geis
ggeis@wyoming.com

Senator John M. Hastert
jhastert2@wyoming.com

Senator John J. Hines
jhines@wyoming.com

Senator Rick Hunnicutt
rhunnicutt@wyoming.com

Senator Kit Jennings
kit@kitsenate.com

Senator Wayne H. Johnson
wajohnsonsd6@yahoo.com

Senator Bill Landen
blanden@bresnan.net

Senator Grant Larson
senlarson@wyoming.com

Senator Marty Martin
mmartin@wyoming.com

Senator Mike Massie
mamassie@msn.com

Senator Curt Meier
cmeier@wyoming.com

Senator Phil Nicholas
nicholas@wyolegal.com

Senator Drew A. Perkins
drew@schwartzbon.com

Senator R. Ray Peterson
rpeterson@wyoming.com

Senator Tony Ross
tross@wyoming.com

Senator John C. Schiffer
jschiffe@wyoming.com

Senator Charles K. Scott
charlesscott@wyoming.com

Senator Kathryn Sessions
ksessions@wyoming.com

Senator Charles Townsend
ctown@wyoming.com

Senator Bill Vasey
bvasey@wyoming.com

Senator Michael Von Flatern
mvonflatern@wyoming.com

US Senator John Barrasso
http://barrasso.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactUs.ContactSubmit&CFID=1239277&CFTOKEN=16382076

US Senator Mike Enzi
http://enzi.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactInformation.EmailSenatorEnzi

US Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis
http://mail01.mail.com/scripts/common/login_home.cgi?a=8f98139853a8036ef957959bc549ccbb9038a83922ff63e1f0f0eb5b4b61dfdabce6feb0bdc38a56668f46386b88ababbac9158156503c7c8e90a60cee2396f14a7bbf2ebfd857c722e5e29ca5151f69d55cb84105916d

Dinosaur Fossils at the University of Wyoming Geological Museum Will No Longer Be On Public Display So That The University Of Wyoming May Continue To Spend Millions Of Tax Dollars On Losing Athletic Teams

Dinosaur Fossils at the University of Wyoming Geological Museum Will No Longer Be On Public Display So That The University Of Wyoming May Continue To Spend Millions Of Tax Dollars On Losing Athletic Teams

As an alum of UW, and a PhD recipient from the Department of Geology and Geophysics, I am naturally and profoundly disturbed at news of the closing of the Geological Museum and firing of the curator, Brent Breithaupt. The museum is one of the outstanding assets of the University and one of its most highly-recognized attributes. Internationally-known and locally-beloved, it is a gem–and a boon to the sciences of Geology, Paleontology and Biology; it should be prized and treasured, not closed.  I am writing to ask that you loudly voice your support for keeping the University of Wyoming Geological Museum open.

In recent years as I have toured much of the Pacific Basin filming segments for my television show I have met literally hundreds of people who know UW only because of the Geological Museum, Curator Breithaupt and the paleontological collections. A University that can waste untold millions on, let’s be honest, fairly lousy athletic programs certainly can afford to continue funding one of its most outstanding outreach programs, most beloved icons and most visible academic successes, especially given the comparatively marginal cost to do so.

Closure of the Museum is short-sighted in so many ways.  Not only does closure represent a relatively minor savings for the University, but from a community standpoint, the Geological Museum is a huge focus of many tourist visits to Laramie—closure of the Museum will result in an enormous loss in tourist re-lated revenue for the town.  I doubt the local businesses recognize how many people come from all over the country just to see this museum…people who have no other reason to visit Laramie or spend money there.  Founded 122 years ago, the museum also is an integral part of the history of the University of Wyoming and Department of Geology and Geophysics; part of the grand tradition of American paleontology in general and Wyoming geological exploration in particular.  In addition, the museum and attendant paleontological research program are an amazing educational resource not just for Laramie but for the entire state of Wyoming.

When the museum is closed, an important part of Wyoming history will be shuttered and the people of Wyoming will lose a significant portion of their heritage. Once closed it will difficult if not impossible to regain the Geological Museums robust resources, vibrancy and panache or its prominence in the international community of museums. How can the UW Trustees and Administration justify squandering millions on lack-luster athletic programs while hoarding the relative pennies it takes to save this unique and beloved treasure, proven academic resource and important piece of Wyoming history?  How can they so blithely rob the people of Wyoming of such a stunning and important part of their legacy and birthright?

In a personal e-mail, University of Wyoming Provost Myron Allen assured me that Christian intolerance, religious superstitions and irrational creationist beliefs have played no part in the closing of the Museum.  However, a quick survey shows that such scientific illiteracy and non-reality-based belief systems are rife among many of the the UW Trustees as well as a sizable number of Members of the Wyoming State Senate and House of Representatives; perhaps this explains the lack of vociferous opposition to this obscene and perverse misallocation of University resources.

The fact that, in this day and age, in this state, so many University Trustees, Senators and Congressmen do not understand the value of a Museum, the fundamentals of science nor even subscribe to any modern notion of science, underlines emphatically and exactly why this University has an absolute ethical responsibility and urgent need to keep this museum open.

In summary, people from all over the world know and love Brent Breithaupt and appreciate the incredible job he does…no one, NO ONE outside Wyoming remembers Fenis Dembo or any other Wyoming athlete. My father has a saying that applies directly: “Put your good where it will do the most”–and your “good” does the “most” by bringing what ever influence you have to bear on the Trustees and Administration of the University of Wyoming to continue to fund and support the UW Geological Museum and Brent Breithaupt, the curator. Please contact everyone you can think of to support keeping the museum open; and please let me know what more I can do to help avert this travesty of funding misallocation.

Sincerely,

Donald B. MacGowan, PhD

More information can be found here.

Please contact the following individuals and institutions:
Important UW email Addresses:
President of the University of Wyoming
Tom Buchannan
tombuch@uwyo.edu

Provost of the University of Wyoming
Prof. Myron Allen, Provost
allen@uwyo.edu

Chairman, Department of Geology and Geophysics
Prof. Art Snoke
snoke@uwyo.edu

State Geologist
Dr. Ronald C. Surdam
rsurdam@uwyo.edu

Governor of the State of Wyoming
Governor Dave Freudenthal
governor@state.wy.us

Letters to the Editor:
kerry.drake@trib.com

http://www.wyomingnews.com/our_services/letter_to_the_editor/

dthomsen@laramieboomerang.com

openforum@denverpost.com

University of Wyoming Trustees:
Jim D. Neiman
jimd@neiman.biz

Warren A. Lauer
warrenlauer@lauerlegal.com

Dave Bostrom
mba-db@mbawyoming.com

Dick Davis
dick@davisandcannon.com

Betty Fear
bfear@centurytel.net

Taylor Haynes, M.D.
rangebeef@aol.com

David F.  Palmerlee
dpalmerlee@vcn.com

Bradford S. Mead
bradmead@wyoming.com

Ann Rochelle
arochelle@casperlaw.net

James Trosper
jltrosper@wyoming.com

Ex Officio Trustees:
Jim McBride
supt@educ.state.wy.us

Kelsey Day
asuwpres@uwyo.edu

Elected Officials:
Members of the Wyoming House of Representatives
Representative Rodney “Pete” Anderson
randerso@wyoming.com

Representative George Bagby
g.bagby@bresnan.net

Representative Joseph M. Barbuto
jbarbuto@wyoming.com

Representative Rosie Berger
rberger@wyoming.com

Representative Stan Blake
sblake@wyoming.com

Representative Dave Bonner, Jr.
dbonner@wyoming.com

Representative Bob Brechtel
bbrechtel@wyoming.com

Representative Kermit C. Brown
kermitbrown@wyoming.com

Representative Edward A. Buchanan
ebuchanan@wyoming.com

Representative James W. Byrd
jbyrd@wyoming.com

Representative Richard L. Cannady
rcannady@wyoming.com

Representative Seth Carson
scarson@wyoming.com

Representative Pat Childers
childers@wyoming.com

Representative Roy Cohee
roy@cytransportation.com

Representative Cathy Connolly
cconnolly@wyoming.com

Representative Bernadine Craft
bcraft@wyoming.com

Representative Kathy Davison
kdavison@wyoming.com

Representative Ross Diercks
diercks@wyoming.com

Representative Amy L. Edmonds
aedmonds@wyoming.com

Representative Ken A. Esquibel
kesquibel@wyoming.com

Representative Mike Gilmore
michaelgilmore@wyoming.com

Representative Keith Gingery
kgingery@wyoming.com

Representative W. Patrick Goggles
pgoggles@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Hales
mary.hales@realestateincasper.com

Representative Timothy P. Hallinan, M.D.
tphallinan@bresnan.net

Representative Debbie Hammons
dhammons@wyoming.com

Representative Steve Harshman
sharshman@wyoming.com

Representative Elaine D. Harvey
harvey00@tctwest.net

Representative Peter S. Illoway
pete_chloeilloway3@msn.com

Representative Allen M. Jaggi
ajaggi@wyoming.com

Representative Peter M. Jorgensen
pjorgensen@jorgensenassociates.com

Representative Jack Landon, Jr.
jlandon@wyoming.com

Representative Thomas A. Lockhart
tlockh1617@aol.com

Representative Thomas E. Lubnau, II
tlubnau@vcn.com

Representative Michael K. Madden
madden@wyoming.com

Representative Robert M. McKim
rmckim@wyoming.com

Representative Del McOmie
dwmcomie@bresnan.net

Representative Erin E. Mercer
emercer@wyoming.com

Representative Saundra Meyer
slmey@wyoming.com

Representative David R. Miller
repmiller@wyoming.com

Representative Lori Millin
lorimillin@bresnan.net

Representative Glenn Moniz
gmoniz@bresnan.net

Representative John W. Patton
johnpatton@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Peasley
fpeasley@wyoming.com

Representative Bryan K. Pedersen
bpedersen@wyoming.com

Representative Owen Petersen
opetersen@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Philp
fphilp@wyoming.com

Representative Lorraine K. Quarberg
lquarberg@wyoming.com

Representative Jim Roscoe
jroscoe@wyoming.com

Representative Mark A. Semlek
msemlek@wyoming.com

Representative Lisa A. Shepperson
lshepperson@wyoming.com

Representative Colin M. Simpson
csimpson@skelaw.com

Representative William “Jeb” Steward
jebsteward@union-tel.com

Representative Tim Stubson
tim@stampedeforstubson.com

Representative Matt Teeters
mteeters@wyoming.com

Representative Bill Thompson
billthompson@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Throne
mthrone@wyoming.com

Representative Sue Wallis
sue.wallis@vcn.com

Representative Dan Zwonitzer
dzwonitzer@wyoming.com

Representative David L. Zwonitzer
davezwonitzer@wyoming.com

Members of the Wyoming State Senate
Senator Jim Anderson
jamesda1@msn.com

Senator Eli D. Bebout
senbebout@wyoming.com

Senator Bruce Burns
bburns@dbburns.com

Senator Cale Case, Ph.D
ccase@wyoming.com

Senator Henry H.R. “Hank” Coe
hcoe@wyoming.com

Senator Stan Cooper
scooperwy@gmail.com

Senator Dan Dockstader
ddockstader@wyoming.com
Senator Floyd A. Esquibel
fesquibel@wyoming.com

Senator Gerald E. Geis
ggeis@wyoming.com

Senator John M. Hastert
jhastert2@wyoming.com

Senator John J. Hines
jhines@wyoming.com

Senator Rick Hunnicutt
rhunnicutt@wyoming.com

Senator Kit Jennings
kit@kitsenate.com

Senator Wayne H. Johnson
wajohnsonsd6@yahoo.com

Senator Bill Landen
blanden@bresnan.net

Senator Grant Larson
senlarson@wyoming.com

Senator Marty Martin
mmartin@wyoming.com

Senator Mike Massie
mamassie@msn.com

Senator Curt Meier
cmeier@wyoming.com

Senator Phil Nicholas
nicholas@wyolegal.com

Senator Drew A. Perkins
drew@schwartzbon.com

Senator R. Ray Peterson
rpeterson@wyoming.com

Senator Tony Ross
tross@wyoming.com

Senator John C. Schiffer
jschiffe@wyoming.com

Senator Charles K. Scott
charlesscott@wyoming.com

Senator Kathryn Sessions
ksessions@wyoming.com

Senator Charles Townsend
ctown@wyoming.com

Senator Bill Vasey
bvasey@wyoming.com

Senator Michael Von Flatern
mvonflatern@wyoming.com

US Senator John Barrasso
http://barrasso.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactUs.ContactSubmit&CFID=1239277&CFTOKEN=16382076

US Senator Mike Enzi
http://enzi.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactInformation.EmailSenatorEnzi

US Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis
http://mail01.mail.com/scripts/common/login_home.cgi?a=8f98139853a8036ef957959bc549ccbb9038a83922ff63e1f0f0eb5b4b61dfdabce6feb0bdc38a56668f46386b88ababbac9158156503c7c8e90a60cee2396f14a7bbf2ebfd857c722e5e29ca5151f69d55cb84105916d

Updates available here, here and here.

The Administration of the University of Wyoming have decided to close the Geological Museum due to a funding shortfall. Despite continuing to lavish millions upon millions of tax dollars on a lack-luster-to-losing Division 1-A Athletic Program, the Administration has tried to reconcile this shameful misallocation of funding as loss of Bowl and television revenue, loss of tradition and loss of long-standing inter-collegiate rivalries.

Well wah-fucking-wah.

What about the 122-year tradition of excellence at the UW Geological Museum?  What about the thousands upon thousands of primary, secondary and college students who annually come to the museum to have their curiosity nurtured, scholastic experiences enriched and their intellects stimulated?  What about the hundreds and hundreds of families who visit the museum each year who otherwise would not come to Laramie and spend money in the local economy?

In fact, revenues from athletics does not come close to compensating the residents of the State of Wyoming for the millions and millions of tax dollars in real cost these programs suck in–just look at the waste of many millions in the new stadium sky boxes as just a single example.  The details of this bait-and-switch deviousness can be found in the UW budget numbers (see for example here: http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=3672 and here: http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=11604) and the thinly disguised misinformation-as-rationale here (http://www.uwyo.edu/president/info.asp?p=11789#Revised).

If we can flush millions away on a robust, if dismally-performing, athletic program, can we not find a couple hundred thousand dollars to keep the successful and popular Museum funded?

Provost Myron Allen proposes his plans for the UW Geological Museum here (http://www.uwyo.edu/presidentsupport/outbox/2009/geology_museum_15_jun_09.pdf).  Although a brilliant mathematician and otherwise decent guy, Dr. Allen’s proposal for closing the museum manages to be simultaneously short-sighted, amateurishly incomplete and maddeningly misleading.

In a personal e-mail, Dr. Allen assured me that Christian intolerance, religious superstitions and irrational creationist beliefs played no part in the closing of the Museum.  However, a quick survey shows that such scientific illiteracy and non-reality-based belief systems are rife among many of the the UW Trustees as well as some Members of the Wyoming State Senate and House of Representatives; perhaps this explains the lack of vociferous opposition to this obscene and perverse misallocation of University resources.

The fact that, in this day and age, in this state, so many University Trustees, Senators and Congressmen do not understand the value of a Museum, the fundamentals of science nor even subscribe to any modern notion of science, underlines emphatically and exactly why this University has an absolute ethical responsibility and urgent need to keep this museum open.

Perhaps it is not possible for non-scientists (such as the UW President and Provost) to understand the importance of science museums, but science and technology only grow though fostering early interest in young students–this is done primarily through programs like the UW Geological Museum. Every time Drs. Buchannan or Allen listen to their iPod, check their schedules on their handheld, email their colleagues or microwave popcorn to eat while watching their plasma screen Televisions, perhaps they should stop and consider the enormous debt Americans pay daily to scientists and engineers developing and refining new technology to produce new products.  Scientists and engineers who chose, and excel at, their professions precisely because as children they had access to, and were captivated by, programs such as the UW Geological Museum provides.

Or perhaps it is our job to remind Dr. Buchannan and Allen of their debt and responsibility to the future.  Below are a list of the most essential people for you to contact and express your outrage at an institution that is willing to pour millions and millions and millions of tax dollars, year after year, into losing athletic programs that produce nothing, while letting a successful, brilliant and beloved academic program, such as the UW Geological Museum, die simply to save a couple measly hundred thousand dollars.  It is clear to even the most casual observer that this is not in the best interests of the people of Wyoming, nor in the spirit of academic excellence to which UW claims to aspire, nor even in keeping with the simple recognition that these men are responsible for preserving for the future the best parts of the present at UW.

Drs. Buchannan and Allen, if allowed to carry through with this hideous misallocation of tax money, are failing miserably at all three tasks.

I am reminded of how Winston Churchill is reported to have once characterized a similar caliber decision: “Save us from the maliciously ignorant and the aggressively stupid!”

Write.  Today.  NOW.  EVERYBODY ON THE LIST!

Sincerely and with hope-

Donald B. MacGowan, PhD

For MORE go here and here.

ADDRESSES:
Important UW email Addresses:
President of the University of Wyoming
Tom Buchannan
tombuch@uwyo.edu

Provost of the University of Wyoming
Prof. Myron Allen, Provost
allen@uwyo.edu

Chairman, Department of Geology and Geophysics
Prof. Art Snoke
snoke@uwyo.edu

State Geologist
Dr. Ronald C. Surdam
rsurdam@uwyo.edu

Governor of the State of Wyoming
Governor Dave Freudenthal
governor@state.wy.us

Letters to the Editor:
kerry.drake@trib.com

http://www.wyomingnews.com/our_services/letter_to_the_editor/

dthomsen@laramieboomerang.com

openforum@denverpost.com

University of Wyoming Trustees:
Jim D. Neiman
jimd@neiman.biz

Warren A. Lauer
warrenlauer@lauerlegal.com

Dave Bostrom
mba-db@mbawyoming.com

Dick Davis
dick@davisandcannon.com

Betty Fear
bfear@centurytel.net

Taylor Haynes, M.D.
rangebeef@aol.com

David F.  Palmerlee
dpalmerlee@vcn.com

Bradford S. Mead
bradmead@wyoming.com

Ann Rochelle
arochelle@casperlaw.net

James Trosper
jltrosper@wyoming.com

Ex Officio Trustees:
Jim McBride
supt@educ.state.wy.us

Kelsey Day
asuwpres@uwyo.edu

Elected Officials:
Members of the Wyoming House of Representatives
Representative Rodney “Pete” Anderson
randerso@wyoming.com

Representative George Bagby
g.bagby@bresnan.net

Representative Joseph M. Barbuto
jbarbuto@wyoming.com

Representative Rosie Berger
rberger@wyoming.com

Representative Stan Blake
sblake@wyoming.com

Representative Dave Bonner, Jr.
dbonner@wyoming.com

Representative Bob Brechtel
bbrechtel@wyoming.com

Representative Kermit C. Brown
kermitbrown@wyoming.com

Representative Edward A. Buchanan
ebuchanan@wyoming.com

Representative James W. Byrd
jbyrd@wyoming.com

Representative Richard L. Cannady
rcannady@wyoming.com

Representative Seth Carson
scarson@wyoming.com

Representative Pat Childers
childers@wyoming.com

Representative Roy Cohee
roy@cytransportation.com

Representative Cathy Connolly
cconnolly@wyoming.com

Representative Bernadine Craft
bcraft@wyoming.com

Representative Kathy Davison
kdavison@wyoming.com

Representative Ross Diercks
diercks@wyoming.com

Representative Amy L. Edmonds
aedmonds@wyoming.com

Representative Ken A. Esquibel
kesquibel@wyoming.com

Representative Mike Gilmore
michaelgilmore@wyoming.com

Representative Keith Gingery
kgingery@wyoming.com

Representative W. Patrick Goggles
pgoggles@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Hales
mary.hales@realestateincasper.com

Representative Timothy P. Hallinan, M.D.
tphallinan@bresnan.net

Representative Debbie Hammons
dhammons@wyoming.com

Representative Steve Harshman
sharshman@wyoming.com

Representative Elaine D. Harvey
harvey00@tctwest.net

Representative Peter S. Illoway
pete_chloeilloway3@msn.com

Representative Allen M. Jaggi
ajaggi@wyoming.com

Representative Peter M. Jorgensen
pjorgensen@jorgensenassociates.com

Representative Jack Landon, Jr.
jlandon@wyoming.com

Representative Thomas A. Lockhart
tlockh1617@aol.com

Representative Thomas E. Lubnau, II
tlubnau@vcn.com

Representative Michael K. Madden
madden@wyoming.com

Representative Robert M. McKim
rmckim@wyoming.com

Representative Del McOmie
dwmcomie@bresnan.net

Representative Erin E. Mercer
emercer@wyoming.com

Representative Saundra Meyer
slmey@wyoming.com

Representative David R. Miller
repmiller@wyoming.com

Representative Lori Millin
lorimillin@bresnan.net

Representative Glenn Moniz
gmoniz@bresnan.net

Representative John W. Patton
johnpatton@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Peasley
fpeasley@wyoming.com

Representative Bryan K. Pedersen
bpedersen@wyoming.com

Representative Owen Petersen
opetersen@wyoming.com

Representative Frank Philp
fphilp@wyoming.com

Representative Lorraine K. Quarberg
lquarberg@wyoming.com

Representative Jim Roscoe
jroscoe@wyoming.com

Representative Mark A. Semlek
msemlek@wyoming.com

Representative Lisa A. Shepperson
lshepperson@wyoming.com

Representative Colin M. Simpson
csimpson@skelaw.com

Representative William “Jeb” Steward
jebsteward@union-tel.com

Representative Tim Stubson
tim@stampedeforstubson.com

Representative Matt Teeters
mteeters@wyoming.com

Representative Bill Thompson
billthompson@wyoming.com

Representative Mary Throne
mthrone@wyoming.com

Representative Sue Wallis
sue.wallis@vcn.com

Representative Dan Zwonitzer
dzwonitzer@wyoming.com

Representative David L. Zwonitzer
davezwonitzer@wyoming.com

Members of the Wyoming State Senate
Senator Jim Anderson
jamesda1@msn.com

Senator Eli D. Bebout
senbebout@wyoming.com

Senator Bruce Burns
bburns@dbburns.com

Senator Cale Case, Ph.D
ccase@wyoming.com

Senator Henry H.R. “Hank” Coe
hcoe@wyoming.com

Senator Stan Cooper
scooperwy@gmail.com

Senator Dan Dockstader
ddockstader@wyoming.com
Senator Floyd A. Esquibel
fesquibel@wyoming.com

Senator Gerald E. Geis
ggeis@wyoming.com

Senator John M. Hastert
jhastert2@wyoming.com

Senator John J. Hines
jhines@wyoming.com

Senator Rick Hunnicutt
rhunnicutt@wyoming.com

Senator Kit Jennings
kit@kitsenate.com

Senator Wayne H. Johnson
wajohnsonsd6@yahoo.com

Senator Bill Landen
blanden@bresnan.net

Senator Grant Larson
senlarson@wyoming.com

Senator Marty Martin
mmartin@wyoming.com

Senator Mike Massie
mamassie@msn.com

Senator Curt Meier
cmeier@wyoming.com

Senator Phil Nicholas
nicholas@wyolegal.com

Senator Drew A. Perkins
drew@schwartzbon.com

Senator R. Ray Peterson
rpeterson@wyoming.com

Senator Tony Ross
tross@wyoming.com

Senator John C. Schiffer
jschiffe@wyoming.com

Senator Charles K. Scott
charlesscott@wyoming.com

Senator Kathryn Sessions
ksessions@wyoming.com

Senator Charles Townsend
ctown@wyoming.com

Senator Bill Vasey
bvasey@wyoming.com

Senator Michael Von Flatern
mvonflatern@wyoming.com

US Senator John Barrasso
http://barrasso.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactUs.ContactSubmit&CFID=1239277&CFTOKEN=16382076

US Senator Mike Enzi
http://enzi.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=ContactInformation.EmailSenatorEnzi

US Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis
http://mail01.mail.com/scripts/common/login_home.cgi?a=8f98139853a8036ef957959bc549ccbb9038a83922ff63e1f0f0eb5b4b61dfdabce6feb0bdc38a56668f46386b88ababbac9158156503c7c8e90a60cee2396f14a7bbf2ebfd857c722e5e29ca5151f69d55cb84105916d

Melancholy, lonely, desolate; this bench cut into the fresh scar of an a’a flow marks the place where the Hawai’ian gods died at the battle of Kuamo’o. Contact with Europeans, especially the whaling and trade fleets, had introduced the Christian religion to Hawai’ians.

Burial Mounds at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Burial Mounds at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Since the Europeans possessed many things; iron, tools, firearms, and much practical and scientific knowledge which the Hawai’ians had never even dreamed of, the ruling class of Hawai’ians considered the European god to be much stronger than their own gods, and began converting to Christianity in the early 19th Century. In 1819, the year before the Christian missionaries arrived in Hawai’i, forces loyal to Kamehameha II (Liholiho), his mother Kepiolani and the dowager Queen Ka’ahumanu began a social movement to overturn the kapu system and the pagan Hawai’ian religion in favor of Christianity.

Many Hawai’ians were unhappy with the abandonment of the old customs, laws and the old gods. Among the priestly class of Kahuna, Kuaiwa and Holoialena were particularly outraged and traveled the countryside haranguing and inciting the Hawaiians to rebellion against the young King Kamehameha II. The son of Kamehameha I’s younger brother, the Ali’i Kekuaokalani (Liholiho’s cousin), led the rebellious warriors and fought a desperate battle here at Kuamo’o to preserve their ancient way of life and to honor their ancient gods. Although both sides used Western weaponry, Kekuaokalani and his forces lost decisively. Both Kekuaokalani and his wife Manono, who fought beside him, died here. Their graves, along with the graves of warriors numbering in the several hundreds, lie under the numerous, large stone altars erected by the victors over the very spots the warriors fell, here at Lekeleke Graveyard.

Kuamo'o Battlefield and Lekeleke Graveyard: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kuamo'o Battlefield and Lekeleke Graveyard: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Those rebels willing to accept the new god and pledge allegiance to the young King Liholiho were pardoned, but resistance among many lingered. Kamehameha II despatched Hoapili to Waimea to battle the last rebels and his victory over them effectively ended all opposition to the overthrow of the gods. Little did the Hawai’ian people realize that this was not just another of the interminable internecine wars between rival Ali’i, but in fact marked the beginning of the end of Hawai’ian culture as they had known it.

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A walk along the dirt road that bisects Kuamo’o Battlefield is ineffably sad and a little creepy. However, the road soon climbs into dryland forest along the lava ocean cliffs and provides some memorable hiking and mountain biking.  The shoreline at Kuamo’o is a great place for whale watching, a picnic in the rough, watching waves batter the headland and sunset views. The little bay here is a great fishing spot and kayak destination…numerous small caves and arches, inconspicuous from shore, call out for the kayaker to explore. Kuamo’o Battlefield is located at the very end of Ali’i Drive at an area know by locals, somewhat appropriately, as “The End of the World”. There are no facilities.

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Feral Goats are a Common Sight at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A video about Kuamo’o Battlefield is available here.


For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.


All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan, all rights reserved.

Melancholy, lonely, desolate; this beach cut into the fresh scar of an a’a flow marks the place where the Hawai’ian gods died at the battle of Kuamo’o. In 1819, the year before the Christian missionaries arrived in Hawai’i, forces loyal to Kamehameha II and Queen Ka’ahumanu fought to overturn the kapu system and the pagan Hawai’ian religion in favor of Christianity. Kahuna Kekuaokalani led the last supporters of the old ways and the old gods and fought a desperate battle here to preserve their ancient way of life, and lost. Their graves, numbering in the several hundreds despite the official-looking marker at the site, are under the numerous, large stone altars erected by the victors over the very spots the warriors fell.

A walk along the dirt road that bisects the battlefield is ineffably sad and a little creepy. However, the road soon climbs into dryland forest along the lava ocean cliffs and provides some memorable hiking and sunset views.

Kuamo’o Battlefield is located at the very end of Ali’i Drive, somewhat appropriately. No facilities.

For more information on exploring the Big Island of Hawaii in general, and the ancient villages and temples of Kona in particular, visit: www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Produced by Donnie MacGowan. Written, directed and filmed by Donnie MacGowan.  Original musical score by Donald B. MacGowan.  All media copyright 2008 by Donald B. MacGowan; all rights reserved.


In ancient times, the Ali’i competed with each other in the sport of Holua, or sledding. A long, steep, trackway paved with stones would be constructed downslope and then covered with tamped dirt and topped with dried grass. The Ali’i would race down these tracks on wooden sleds, or “holua” as competition. These races were very dangerous and only the Ali’i were allowed to compete. This particular holua is unique because, not only is it the largest and longest and best preserved in Hawai’i, but also because when constructed it went all the way into the sea at Keauhou Bay.

Despite this important archeological site being a National Historic Landmark, much of it was bulldozed by developers building resorts and a golf course.

The nearby village of Holualoa is named after this sledway; “holua” meaning “sled” and “loa” meaning “long”.

The Historic Landmark is best viewed from Ali’i Drive, directly across from the Kona Country Club parking lot. No facilities.

For more information on exploring the Big Island of Hawaii in general, and the ancient villages and temples of Kona in particular, visit: www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Produced by Donald MacGowan.