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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Anthropomorphic petroglyph at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Pu’u Loa Petroglyphs

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Visitors inspect petroglyphs at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Along the side of the centuries-old Ka’u-Puna trail, worn smooth by generations of travelers, in the area of the Hill of Long Life (Pu’u Loa), lies the largest petroglyph field in Polynesia. It is estimated that the Pu’u Loa field contains in excess of 15,000 carvings. A one mile segment of this ancient trail, from the parking lot along the Chain of Craters Road to the petroglyphs, has been marked with cairns (or “ahu”) by the Park staff to lead visitors to the petroglyphs. As you hike along this trail, notice the smoothness of the lava, the sheen on the trail worn by generations of travelers’ feet.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Anthropomorphic couple, Pu'u Loa Petroglyph Field, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many theories concerning the origin and meanings of these carvings but one thing is certain. People stopped here for hundreds of years and left their mark on the stone. Among the designs are simple holes, spirals, concentric circles, human forms and others which are unrecognizable, geometric shapes. The hills and swales of pahoehoe surrounding the boardwalk contain thousands more petroglyphs, but due to their fragility, you are advised to remain on the boardwalk to keep from damaging them.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Canoe petroglyph at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Pu’u Loa, the hill at the margin of the boardwalk, is the place where Hawai’ians came to bury the umbilical chord (“piko”) of their children. People came from all over the Hawai’ian Islands to bury their child’s piko in this place of “mana” (Hawai’ian for power), the home of the Goddess Pele. Grinding out a cup-shaped hole, the Hawai’ians would place the piko in the ground to insure long life, and good grace from the Goddess, for their child.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Ciphers in stone, the petroglyphs of Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Remember that these carvings, though many hundreds of years old, are extremely fragile so remain on the boardwalk—do not step into the petroglyph field, even for a better view, or onto the carvings themselves. The boardwalk passes by hundreds of carvings near enough for you to examine them minutely and photograph the completely. This self-guided tour takes about 1 hour. Please do not litter or deface the carvings, taking rubbings is not allowed nor is making casts.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Petroglyph figures at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

For more information on Hawaiian petroglyphs in general, and discussion of other petroglyph localities, please go here.

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html.

The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Honu petroglyph at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset lights-up Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Mauna Ulu

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset and alpenglow at Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Mauna Ulu, or “growing mountain” is a still steaming, tall, shield-shaped hill formed by numerous eruptions along the rift between 1969 and 1974. Mauna Ulu is best seen by walking beyond the parking lot to where the end of road is covered in fresh lava flows. At Mauna Ulu, visitors can get an intimate look at both pahoehoe and a’a lava flow types.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Mauna Ulu Crater from the air, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Pahoehoe, the less viscous and generally hotter liquid flow, moves fluidly like a river or glacier, the surface folding and molding, like poured taffy, into a ropey structure. Pahoehoe forms generally flat, fairly smooth, hard surfaces. A’a, on the other hand, is much cooler and has exolved much of its dissolved gas, so it is much more viscous, causing the upper surface to fracture into clinker-like boulders and fragments. Flowing a’a sounds and looks like a moving pile of hot glass shards; when it cools, it leaves behind rubbly piles of sharp fragments. Fields of pahoehoe and a’a make a landscape that look as if Madame Pele has bulldozed her land to flat surfaces, but left these acres of boulder piles here and there.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Barren slopes of Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

The hike to the summit of Mauna Ulu is fabulous and rewarding. However, it is a long, dry, serious hike with some dangers (rock fall, crater collapse, scalding steam and others) and should only be undertaken by those in good physical condition and experienced at hiking cross-country across broken and hazardous ground.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Aerial view of Pu'u Huluhulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Pu’u Huluhulu (“shaggy hill”) is a 150 foot tall cinder cone formed in pre-contact times between Mauna Ulu and Pauahi Crater. There is a fascinating 3 mile round trip hike from the Mauna Ulu parking lot to the top of Pu’u Huluhulu that is marked by cairns (or “ahu”). The round trip hike from Mauna Ulu Parking lot to Pu’u Huluhulu and return takes about an hour and a half to two hours. From the vantage point of Pu’u Huluhulu’s summit are fine views of Mauna Loa, Kilauea, Mauna Kea, the coastline and the very interesting, active cinder cone, Pu’u O’o (hill of the bird”), about 5 miles away.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Aerial View of Pu'u O'o Vent, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Pu’u O’o was built by the fire-fountains erupting along Kilauea’s rift zone between 1983 and 1986. Since 1986, the center of eruption has moved about 2 miles further down the rift to a vent called “Kupaianaha”, or ”mysterious” in Hawai’ian. However, within the maw of Pu’u O’o is an active lava lake, which serves as a window into the plumbing of the eruptive rift system.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

An a'a lava flow piled up on a pahoehoe flow in front of Pu'u Huluhulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The rubble slopes of Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Ohi'a blossom and Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.
New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset and alpenglow at Mauna Ulu, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Morning rainstorm at Kealakomo, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Kealakomo Overlook

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The south coast of Hawaii from Kealakomo Overlook, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

At Kealakomo, the road breaks over the edge of the Holei Pali. The upper portion of Kilauea is separated from the coastal plains by a series of fault escarpments, where the lower coast has moved down relative to the rest of the mountain. Sometimes these movements are immense as enormous chunks of land slide catastrophically off into the sea, such as has happened at Kealakekua Bay in Kona and on the Hilina Pali, here in the Park.

Over time, the coastal plain block here at Kealakomo has fallen as much as 1400 feet relative to the main block of Kilauea Volcano. At Kealakomo you can see how the recent lava flows from Mauna Ulu have been draped over the giant escarpment.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Summer Rainbow at Kealakomo, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

In 1975 a 7.2 magnitude earthquake heralded the movement of the lower fault block, dropping it by as much as ten feet downward and sliding it seaward by as much as twenty feet. This movement triggered a local tsunami which swept a group of a few dozen young campers who had horse-packed into the abandoned village of Halape thousands of feet inland; fortunately, only two men a some horses were drowned, the others miraculously survived.

The Kealakomo Overlook has a picnic tables on an overlook platform, incredible views, a generally cool breeze, but no water, restrooms or other services available.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The old covered pavilion at Kealakomo Overlook, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The view toward Halape and Keauhou from Kealakomo, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

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All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kealakomo Rainbow, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

The area around Miloli'i and Honomalino Beach are infused with the je nais se quois of Old Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The area around Miloli'i and Honomalino Beach are infused with the je nais se quois of Old Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Whether you visit the Big Island for a few days, a couple weeks or a few months, you want to make the most of your time in Paradise. With such a wide variety of natural and commercial attractions, it is natural for the visitor to get a little overwhelmed in the “Option Overload” and not be able to make a balanced and informed decision on what they want to do and how best to spend their time.

View of Honomalino Bay, Looking North: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

View of Honomalino Bay, Looking North: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Even choosing the beach you want to spend time on…which beach? How do you find the right beach for your particular needs? Are you going just to relax and sunbathe? Or is the trip to snorkel, boogie board or to explore? Do you want a beach that’s alive with fun people or one hidden, secluded and empty? Do you want a beach near your resort or one that’s at the end of a day of delicious wandering?

The Kona Coast Near Miloli'i: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Kona Coast Near Miloli'i: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Tour Guide Hawaii is excited and proud to announce the release of their new GPS/WiFi enabled App for iPhone and iPod that helps you navigate your trip to Hawaii with hours of informative, location-aware video and information. Although our video guide will lead you to dozens of unusual, untamed and unspoiled spots, let’s look at one, hidden but gorgeous, beach hike you would otherwise not find if you did not have Tour Guide Hawaii’s new App.

Hiking to Honomalino

Along the Honomalino Trail: Phto by Donald B. MacGowan

Along the Honomalino Trail: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A true gem of West Hawai’i, and rarely crowded, Honomalino Bay lies on the southeast flanks of Mauna Loa along the southernmost Kona Coast. The beach is reached by a 20 minute hike starting in the Old Hawaiian Fishing Village of Miloli’i, which is perhaps the last, truly Hawai’ian fishing village in West Hawai’i. Miloli’i is a tightly knit local community who are perhaps best left to themselves by the casual visitor. Though the surfing and the snorkeling here are excellent, the beach lovely and the facilities in good repair, the visitor may not find the aloha for outsiders terribly abundant. Especially on weekends.

Parking for the Hike is at the Miloli'i County Park Pavilion: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Parking for the Hike is at the Miloli'i County Park Pavilion: Photo by Donald MacGowan

The Hike to Honomalino Beach Starts between the County Park Restrooms and this Yellow Church: Photo by Donald MacGowan

The Hike to Honomalino Beach Starts between the County Park Restrooms and this Yellow Church: Photo by Donald MacGowan

The Trailhead for the Honomalino Bay Hike: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Trailhead for the Honomalino Bay Hike: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

However, by hiking south to Honomalino Bay, the causal visitor finds everything they are looking for in a quiet, secluded beach. Park at the Miloli’i County Beach Park; the hike begins at an obvious trailhead near the end of the road, between the restrooms and the yellow church. The trail wanders along the coast, in and out of the surf line, to the wild and untamed Honomalino Bay—a wonderful place to picnic, snorkel or kayak.

When Hiking to Honomalino Beach, Stay on the Trail, Avoid Private Property and When in Doubt, Take the Right Fork: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

When Hiking to Honomalino Beach, Stay on the Trail, Avoid Private Property and When in Doubt, Take the Right Fork: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Keawe Thickets along the Honomalino Beach Trail Mean You Should Wear Sturdy Shoes to Avoid the Ginormous Thorns: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Keawe Thickets along the Honomalino Beach Trail Mean You Should Wear Sturdy Shoes to Avoid the Ginormous Thorns: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

As the trail to Honomalino Beach Winds Toward the Shore, It Passes Several Private Residences and Private Property; Be Sure To Respect These People's Property and Privacy: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

As the trail to Honomalino Beach Winds Toward the Shore, It Passes Several Private Residences and Private Property; Be Sure To Respect These People's Property and Privacy: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

On the hike in, be sure to keep always to the right at any fork in the trail to avoid trespassing on private property. Honomalino Beach itself is fronted by private property and dwellings, so be respectful of these peoples’ homes and privacy.

The Honomalino Beach Trail Squeezes Between Private Residences and a Private Beach: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Honomalino Beach Trail Squeezes Between Private Residences and a Private Beach: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Snorkeling is most interesting on the north side in the rocks, or the extreme southern reach of the bay. Go in only when the surf is low; be cautious of the open ocean currents and rip tides. The water, though very clear, is sometimes quite cold due to spring discharge in the sand on the beach.

Behind the Berm, in the Back Dunes of Honomalino Beach, Is a Shady Paradise on Hot Days: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Behind the Berm, in the Back Dunes of Honomalino Beach, Is a Shady Paradise on Hot Days: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Exploring on foot in the area of the bay and further south provides many wonders and archeological treasures, from abandoned temples and villages to the largest holua, or sledding track, in Hawaii. Remember to respect the Hawaiian natives, their culture and their sacred sites…take noting but pictures, don’t even leave footprints, stay on established roads and trails.

Superb Snorkeling Exists on the North Side of the Bay by the Rocks: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Superb Snorkeling Exists on the North Side of the Bay by the Rocks: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

There is no fresh water anywhere along this hike, so be sure to bring plenty of drinking water. It’s also nice to bring a couple of extra quarts of water to rinse off after swimming, and dry clothes to hike out in.

There are no provisions for restrooms or trash disposal, either, so wait until you are back at the county park for restrooms and remember to hike out with everything you brought in, including trash.

Honomalino Beach Looking South and East Into the Morning Sun: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Honomalino Beach Looking South and East Into the Morning Sun: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

As the trail crosses significant swathes of both sharp aa lava fields and thick keawe tree copses (with there numerous, impressive and painful thorns), it is imperative that you wear at least running shoes, if not hiking boots, to protect your feet.

Hiking Back to Miloli'i You'll Be Glad of Sturdy Shoes to Fend Off the Huge Keawe Thorns: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Hiking Back to Miloli'i You'll Be Glad of Sturdy Shoes to Fend Off the Huge Keawe Thorns: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

No services at all are available at the beach, and there are no commercial services in Miloli’i. Please leave no valuables in your car.

Sharp a'a Lava Along the Honomalino Trail Makes You Glad You Wore Real Shoes!: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Sharp a'a Lava Along the Honomalino Trail Makes You Glad You Wore Real Shoes!: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html.  The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.  For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Could You Have Found This Without Tour Guide? The House in Miloli'i Where Elvis Presley Lived in the Movie "Girls Girls Girls": Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Could You Have Found This Without Tour Guide? The House in Miloli'i Where Elvis Presley Lived in the Movie "Girls Girls Girls": Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.