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Tag Archives: KEauhou Historic District

Melancholy, lonely, desolate; this bench cut into the fresh scar of an a’a flow marks the place where the Hawai’ian gods died at the battle of Kuamo’o. Contact with Europeans, especially the whaling and trade fleets, had introduced the Christian religion to Hawai’ians.

Burial Mounds at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Burial Mounds at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Since the Europeans possessed many things; iron, tools, firearms, and much practical and scientific knowledge which the Hawai’ians had never even dreamed of, the ruling class of Hawai’ians considered the European god to be much stronger than their own gods, and began converting to Christianity in the early 19th Century. In 1819, the year before the Christian missionaries arrived in Hawai’i, forces loyal to Kamehameha II (Liholiho), his mother Kepiolani and the dowager Queen Ka’ahumanu began a social movement to overturn the kapu system and the pagan Hawai’ian religion in favor of Christianity.

Many Hawai’ians were unhappy with the abandonment of the old customs, laws and the old gods. Among the priestly class of Kahuna, Kuaiwa and Holoialena were particularly outraged and traveled the countryside haranguing and inciting the Hawaiians to rebellion against the young King Kamehameha II. The son of Kamehameha I’s younger brother, the Ali’i Kekuaokalani (Liholiho’s cousin), led the rebellious warriors and fought a desperate battle here at Kuamo’o to preserve their ancient way of life and to honor their ancient gods. Although both sides used Western weaponry, Kekuaokalani and his forces lost decisively. Both Kekuaokalani and his wife Manono, who fought beside him, died here. Their graves, along with the graves of warriors numbering in the several hundreds, lie under the numerous, large stone altars erected by the victors over the very spots the warriors fell, here at Lekeleke Graveyard.

Kuamo'o Battlefield and Lekeleke Graveyard: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kuamo'o Battlefield and Lekeleke Graveyard: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Those rebels willing to accept the new god and pledge allegiance to the young King Liholiho were pardoned, but resistance among many lingered. Kamehameha II despatched Hoapili to Waimea to battle the last rebels and his victory over them effectively ended all opposition to the overthrow of the gods. Little did the Hawai’ian people realize that this was not just another of the interminable internecine wars between rival Ali’i, but in fact marked the beginning of the end of Hawai’ian culture as they had known it.

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A walk along the dirt road that bisects Kuamo’o Battlefield is ineffably sad and a little creepy. However, the road soon climbs into dryland forest along the lava ocean cliffs and provides some memorable hiking and mountain biking.  The shoreline at Kuamo’o is a great place for whale watching, a picnic in the rough, watching waves batter the headland and sunset views. The little bay here is a great fishing spot and kayak destination…numerous small caves and arches, inconspicuous from shore, call out for the kayaker to explore. Kuamo’o Battlefield is located at the very end of Ali’i Drive at an area know by locals, somewhat appropriately, as “The End of the World”. There are no facilities.

Kayakers Explore Caves and Arches Offshore from Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Feral Goats are a Common Sight at Kuamo'o Battlefield: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A video about Kuamo’o Battlefield is available here.


For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.


All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan, all rights reserved.


Written and produced by Donnie MacGowan; videography and original musical score by Donald B. MacGowan.
Mo’o Twins Homesite and Punawai Spring
On opposite sides of the Keauhou Beach Hotel Tennis Courts lie the homesite of the legendary Mo’o Twins and Punawai Spring. Legend tells us that the Mo’o Twins were prophetesses of the lizard goddess who, through time, became goddesses in their own right. The fertility pit at Punawai Spring is an example of the rare, freshwater springs in this area, which were the only source of drinking water and were the only reasons villages could survive in Kona. In modern times, the Hotel has promoted wedding ceremonies in the glade around Punawai springs, a Western reflection of the ancient practice of Hawai’ian girls bathing in them to insure fertile child-bearing years.

To reach Mo’o Twins Homesite and Punawai Spring, park either in the Kahalu’u Beach Park or at Keauhou Outrigger Beach Resort. From Kahalu’u, walk onto the Keauhou Outrigger Beach Resort property through the gateway in the fence between them and follow the asphalt path to the pool deck, through the lobby of the resort and join the paved path that runs along the end of the Resort driveway. From the Resort parking lot, walk up the drive to the paved path that runs along the end of the driveway. Following along this path, one comes first to the Punawai Spring. Where the path runs around the end of the tennis courts is a lovely little glade enclosed by a tidal pool…this is the homesite of the Legendary Mo’o Twins.

Paokamenehune
The breakwater predates the 15th century temple complexes in the area and is widely said to have been built by the menehune (sort of the Hawai’ian equivalent to leprechauns), but building was actually initiated to enclose the bay as a fishpond. Whether the work became beyond the powers of the Ali’i at the time to administrate or the surfing faction won-out in the battle over use of Kahalu’u Bay is not known, but the breakwater was already in disarray at the time of European contact in the 18th century.

To reach Paokamenehune Seawall, park either in the Kahalu’u Beach Park or at Keauhou Outrigger Beach Resort. From Kahalu’u, walk onto the Keauhou Outrigger Beach Resort property through the gateway in the fence between them and follow the asphalt path to the pool deck. From the Resort parking lot, walk up the drive and cross through the lobby to the pool deck. Walk across the tide flat to the water’s edge and follow it out to the obvious line of large stones that comprise the seawall. Beware of the rock with is very, very slippery when wet and bear in mind that walking along the seawall is extremely dangerous.

For more information on visiting Hawaii in general and touring the cultural site of the Big Island in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.