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by Donald B. MacGowan

Kipuka Kahalihi Kipukas are holes between lava flows where vegetation is saved from being incinerated or buried.  At Kipuka Kahalihi, however, much of the vegetation was buried in hot cinders blown here from the 1969 Mauna Ulu fire fountains.  Only the tall vegetation was preserved from ash burial and only very hardy species have grown back since the eruption.  Wandering between the parking lot at Mauna Ulu and the margins of Kipuka Kahalihi one finds the rifts that opened to vent the fire fountains of the 1969 eruptions—a Martian wilderness of twisted lava forms and volcanic ejecta that is well worth exploring.  There are no services available at Kipuka Kahalihi.

Kipuka Kahali'i: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Kipuka Kahali’i

Kipuka Kahalihi Kipukas are holes between lava flows where vegetation is saved from being incinerated or buried.  At Kipuka Kahalihi, however, much of the vegetation was buried in hot cinders blown here from the 1969 Mauna Ulu fire fountains.  Only the tall vegetation was preserved from ash burial and only very hardy species have grown back since the eruption.  Wandering between the parking lot at Mauna Ulu and the margins of Kipuka Kahalihi one finds the rifts that opened to vent the fire fountains of the 1969 eruptions—a Martian wilderness of twisted lava forms and volcanic ejecta that is well worth exploring.  There are no services available at Kipuka Kahalihi.

Inside Kipuka Kahali'i, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Kipukas are holes between lava flows where vegetation is saved from being incinerated or buried. At Kipuka Kahali’i, however, much of the vegetation was buried in hot cinders blown here from the 1969 Mauna Ulu fire fountains. Only the tall vegetation was preserved from ash burial and only very hardy species have grown back since the eruption.

Wandering between the parking lot at Mauna Ulu and the margins of Kipuka Kahali’i one finds the rifts that opened to vent the fire fountains of the 1969 eruptions—a Martian wilderness of twisted lava forms and volcanic ejecta that is well worth exploring.

There are no services available at Kipuka Kahali’i.

Kipuka Kahalihi Kipukas are holes between lava flows where vegetation is saved from being incinerated or buried.  At Kipuka Kahalihi, however, much of the vegetation was buried in hot cinders blown here from the 1969 Mauna Ulu fire fountains.  Only the tall vegetation was preserved from ash burial and only very hardy species have grown back since the eruption.  Wandering between the parking lot at Mauna Ulu and the margins of Kipuka Kahalihi one finds the rifts that opened to vent the fire fountains of the 1969 eruptions—a Martian wilderness of twisted lava forms and volcanic ejecta that is well worth exploring.  There are no services available at Kipuka Kahalihi.

Flows and cinders from Mauna Ulu fire fountains surround Kipuka Kahalihi, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

Kipuka Kahalihi Kipukas are holes between lava flows where vegetation is saved from being incinerated or buried.  At Kipuka Kahalihi, however, much of the vegetation was buried in hot cinders blown here from the 1969 Mauna Ulu fire fountains.  Only the tall vegetation was preserved from ash burial and only very hardy species have grown back since the eruption.  Wandering between the parking lot at Mauna Ulu and the margins of Kipuka Kahalihi one finds the rifts that opened to vent the fire fountains of the 1969 eruptions—a Martian wilderness of twisted lava forms and volcanic ejecta that is well worth exploring.  There are no services available at Kipuka Kahalihi.

The lava flows surrounding Kipuka Kahalihi, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset at Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Holei Sea Arch

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Along the sea cliffs that surround the Island of Hawai’i, arches and sea stacks are formed where wild waves and tides exploit minute differences in the hardness of various layers of lava flow and airfall material, making strange, gravity-defying natural sculptures. Although common, there are few places where these arches and stacks are easily viewable–one such place is the Holei Sea Arch, which is currently directly seaward of the end of the Chain of Craters Road.

At Holei Sea Arch the cliffs are 80 to 90 feet high, but many waves still spray and wash over them, so use caution when approaching and photographing the arch. Notice along the lower cliffs in the area toward the eruption viewing platform, the several large boulders which have been dropped by giant, angry waves crashing over the sea cliffs. Imagine the power of a wave that would have enough force to deposit a several-ton boulder on a cliff 30-60 feet about the surface of the ocean.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sea arches, cliffs and wild ocean at the end of Chain of Craters Road, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

Littoral explosion plume from the end of Chain of Craters Road, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Photo by Donald B MacGowan.jpg

Littoral explosion plume from Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan