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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset at Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Holei Sea Arch

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Along the sea cliffs that surround the Island of Hawai’i, arches and sea stacks are formed where wild waves and tides exploit minute differences in the hardness of various layers of lava flow and airfall material, making strange, gravity-defying natural sculptures. Although common, there are few places where these arches and stacks are easily viewable–one such place is the Holei Sea Arch, which is currently directly seaward of the end of the Chain of Craters Road.

At Holei Sea Arch the cliffs are 80 to 90 feet high, but many waves still spray and wash over them, so use caution when approaching and photographing the arch. Notice along the lower cliffs in the area toward the eruption viewing platform, the several large boulders which have been dropped by giant, angry waves crashing over the sea cliffs. Imagine the power of a wave that would have enough force to deposit a several-ton boulder on a cliff 30-60 feet about the surface of the ocean.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sea arches, cliffs and wild ocean at the end of Chain of Craters Road, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

Littoral explosion plume from the end of Chain of Craters Road, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Photo by Donald B MacGowan.jpg

Littoral explosion plume from Holei Sea Arch, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

They aren't kidding about Devil's Throat, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Devil’s Throat

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Devil's Throat, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Less than 1/10 of a mile southwest along Chain of Craters Road from the Hilina Pali Road turnoff is a small patch of bare ground, the parking spot for the unmarked Devil’s Throat collapse crater. Devil’s Throat is an excitingly vertically-sided pit crater that is worth the visit just for the “okole squeezing” peering down the throat will give you.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Devil's Throat lies along this lineament of large surface cracks, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

An unmarked, approximately 50 meter trail leads south east from the road along a prominent earth fracture to the 30 meter wide by 55 meter deep pit. Keep your eyes on the trail in front of you at all times as you approach. Do not allow children or exuberant adults run ahead, especially in the dark, fog or vog, as there are NO safety rails and absolutely NO warning the crater is coming up…one simply arrives, teetering, at the brink. Be extremely careful approaching the crater rim, as the edge is very unstable and prone to collapse. It is also an interesting hike to trace the prominent fracture lines back towards Hilina Pali on the northwest side of the road to the prominent fault escarpment.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

There are no ejecta surrounding the crater indicating that Devil's Throat formed from collapse not explosion, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Collapse pit craters are formed when magma is rapidly extruded from one portion of a subterranean magma chamber to another, or is erupted onto land. The ground above the recently evacuated portion of the magma chamber simply collapses. Essentially, the entirety of the land traversed by chain of Craters Road is pocked with these features.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The hiker comes upon Devil's Throat with absolutely no warning of the gaping pit yawing before them Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Viewing and photography are best done at Devil’s Throat when the sun is high in the sky and the walls and bottom of the crater are not in shadow.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Frank Burgess is wise to keep well back from the lip of Devil's Throat, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The trail to Devil's Throat is an unremarkable path along some prominent earth fractures, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Looking Into Devil's Throat, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Waimea is the gateway to exploring the mountain country of Hawaii Island, especially Mauna Kea: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Waimea Town

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Waimea from the Waikoloa Road, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Snuggled deeply between Mauna Kea Volcano and Kohala Mountain, sometimes startlingly sunny, sometimes shrouded in mist, Waimea is the heart of “Paniolo”, or Hawai’ian Cowboy Country. It was here that John Parker established the first commercial cattle venture in Hawaii, Parker Ranch, around 1816. Few mainlanders realize that three generations of Paniolo, Hawaiian cowboys, lived, worked and died in Hawaii before white men ever drove cattle into Wyoming or Montana. The sport of rodeo is older here than almost anywhere else in the US.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Downtown Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Sometimes confusing to visitors is the fact that Waimea/Kamuela has two names; “Kamuela” is the Hawai’ian word for the name “Samuel”, named after Samuel Spencer. “Waimea” is the name of the ancient Hawai’ian village that was located here in pre-contact times. Picturesquely, “Waimea” in Hawai’ian means “slop” or “muddy”, which reflects the native Hawai’ian’s poor opinion of this rainy, cold region. The post office steadfastly refers to it as “Kamuela” so as not to be confused with the two other “Waimeas” in the state.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunrise on Mauna Loa and the Saddle Road, just out of Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Waimea is in the middle of some of the most incredible scenery in the world, and the intersection of many of the best scenic drives on the island. Midway on Highway 19 between Kailua Kona and Hilo, or Kailua Kona and Waipi’o Canyon, simply touring between Kona and Hilo through Waimea is a wonderful trip. Climbing up through dryland forest to the upland lava flows and rolling grasslands of the Kohala-Mauna Kea Saddle , the road swoops down again through eucalyptus forests to tropical jungle canyons and the feral sugar cane fields of the Hamakua Coast.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Observatories on the Summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Waimea also serves as the gateway to adventures o Hawaii’s highest peak, the tallest mountain on earth, Mauna Kea, as well as the incomparably grand Mauna Kea-Mauna Loa saddle area, via the Saddle Road (Highway 200). You can learn more about the Saddle Road here, and exploring Mauna Kea, here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Through the ironwood forests on the Kohala Mountain Road, near Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

The fabulous north Kohala Coast can be reached from Waimea via the Kohala Mountain Road (Highway 250), an incredibly beautiful drive through upland meadow and forest to the old-time Hawaii town and artist community at Hawi. Can learn more about the Kohala Mountain Road here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Along Church Row in Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Waimea offers some of the finest shopping, restaurants and the most modern hospital on the island. Although it seems a little rough and tumble, and jeans and flannel shirts appear to be the uniform, Waimea is actually a very sophisticated town. Peruse the list below for a taste of what Paniolo Country, Waimea, has to offer the visitor.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Cows along the Kohala Mountain Road near Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Paniolo Country: The cattle industry on Hawaii began on February 22, 1793, at Kealakekua, when British Navigator George Vancouver presented a gift of cows to King Kamehameha. With no training or knowledge of how to handle them, the cows were allowed to roam free and soon turned wild.

Shortly after horses were brought to Hawaii in 1804, Kamehameha recruited California Vaquero Joachin Armas to help contain the wild cattle and train local cowboys. Over the years, more Spanish mission vaqueros came to work for the burgeoning Hawaiian cattle industry. The Hawai’ians called the vaqueros “paniolos” a corruption of the Spanish word “Espańola”; which today remains the island word for “cowboy”.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Old Waimea Town, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

In the late 1800s, piers and docks began to be built at various shipping spots around the island and the cows were unceremoniously chased into the ocean, lashed by their horns to longboats, then rowed out only to be unceremoniously hoisted by crane onto the deck of the waiting ships.

Ranch culture by its nature is fairly isolated. As such, this allowed the Paniolos to preserve many Hawaiian traditions through the turbulent nineteenth century, such as the art of Hula and the Hawaiian Language, which the missionaries actively tried to eradicate. You can learn more about the Paniolos and the Hawaii cattle industry here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Waimea Town from Kohala Mountain Road, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Parker Ranch, Historic Homes and Gardens: The Parker Ranch is the largest cattle ranch in America under single family ownership and with almost 200 years of history, it is one of the oldest. In 1809, the 19-year old John Parker jumped ship on the Island of Hawai’i. Coming to the attention of King Kamehameha the Great, Parker was trusted with helping the King bring the Kingdom of Hawai’i into modern times.

John Parker was also given the task of shooting many of the wild cattle which rampaged and pillaged the countryside. Parker taught the natives how to render the meat into salt beef which was then sold to the passing whaling and merchant ships and soon became Hawai’i’s number one export. John Parker was given an initial grant of 2 acres land by the King. When he married Princess Kipikane in 1816, Kamehameha the Great’s granddaughter, she was granted some 640 acres…this is how the Parker Ranch began.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

West Waimea from Mauna Kea Summit, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

There is some irony here, as the Hawaiians considered the land around Waimea nearly worthless—cold and rainy, it was no good for producing traditional Hawai’ian food crops and uncomfortable for living in traditional Hawai’ian homes. However, Parker saw it was perfect for raising cattle. He kept buying and adding land to his holdings until today; the ranch he started covers nearly 10% of the Island’s landmass, a whopping 150,000 acres.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

This cinder cone was used by Marines in training for the battle for Iwo Jima, outside Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

In addition to its importance in beginning and fostering the ranching industry on the Island of Hawai’i, Parker Ranch was also important to Hawaii’s contribution to the war effort during the Second World War. During the years 1943-1945 more than 50,000 marines of the 2nd and 5th Marine Divisions, Navy sailors and Army soldiers used Camp Tarawa, located entirely on the Parker Ranch, for rest and recuperation from the historic assault on Tarawa, as well as training for the assaults on Iwo Jima, Leyte and Guam and the occupation of Kyushu. Tours of Parker Ranch, and the historic Parker Ranch House and gardens, are an interesting addition to your Hawaiian vacation.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Waimea Nature Park Green House sells plants, cuttings and seedx of native Hawiian plants: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Waimea Nature Park: Tucked away on the outskirts of Waimea, out of the way of noise and traffic, is an interesting, if small, gem of a park. The Waimea Nature Park, maintained by the Waimea Outdoor Circle, is a lovely expanse of lawns and gardens, walking trails and a plant nursery. A wonderful place to have a picnic lunch, walk the dog or stretch the legs, Waimea Nature Park also hosts sales to the public of plant saplings and cuttings.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Waimea Park in Downtown Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Waimea Park: With picnic tables and shelters, pit barbecues, water, restrooms, a large children’s playground and ball fields, the Waimea Park in the center of town is a great place to stop, have a bite to eat and stretch the legs in the middle of the long drive across the middle of the Big Island.

Waimea Restaurant Row: This is one of the primary commercial centers of Waimea which is not located in the Parker Ranch Center or Waimea Center. Most of the town’s fine dining establishments as well as the more colorful, but less upscale, cafes are located along this stretch of roadway.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Inside the Isaacs Art Center, Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Isaacs Art Center: The Isaacs Art Center is a fine art museum and gallery with a smallish permanent collection, but which also regularly features many fine temporary exhibits and traveling art shows. A really fine establishment, the gallery, run by Kamehameha Schools, is something of a surprise to find in the roughish “cowboy country” of upcountry Waimea.

Waimea Center: One of the two principle centers of commercial activity in the center of town, Waimea Center has a large-chain food store, a pharmacy, numerous restaurants, gift and boutique shops, fast food restaurants and public restrooms.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Statue of famed Paniolo Ikua Purdy at Parker Ranch Center, Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Parker Ranch Center: The other principle shopping-center in Waimea, Parker Ranch Center has a large-chain food store, pharmacy, banks, the Kamuela Post Office, a food court, numerous restaurants, gift and boutique shops and public restrooms. In addition, a small museum about Parker Ranch is located here; this is where tours of the Ranch may be booked and boarded.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Boot Sculpture at Waimea Center, Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Looking toward Waimea from Kohala Mountain Road, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Welcome to Waimea, Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

Majestic Pololu Valley on the Hamakua Coast of Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Majestic Pololu Valley on the Hamakua Coast of Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Whether you visit the Big Island for a few days, a couple weeks or a few months, you want to make the most of your time in Paradise. With such a wide variety of natural and commercial attractions, it is natural for the visitor to get a little overwhelmed in the “Option Overload” and not be able to make a balanced and informed decision on what they want to do and how best to spend their time.
At Pololu Valley, Hamakua Coast, Big Island, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

At Pololu Valley, Hamakua Coast, Big Island, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Even choosing the beach you want to spend time on…which beach? How do you find the right beach for your particular needs? Are you going just to relax and sunbathe? Or is the trip to snorkel, boogie board or to explore? Do you want a beach that’s alive with fun people or one hidden, secluded and empty? Do you want a beach near your resort or one that’s at the end of a day of delicious wandering?
The Cliffs at Pololu: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Cliffs at Pololu: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Tour Guide Hawaii is excited and proud to announce the release of their new GPS/WiFi enabled App for iPhone and iPod that helps you navigate your trip to Hawaii with hours of informative, location-aware video and information. Although our video guide will lead you to dozens of unusual, untamed and unspoiled spots, let’s look at one, hidden but gorgeous, beach hike you would otherwise not find if you did not have Tour Guide Hawaii’s new App.
Bad News for Antsy Travelers at Pololu Valley; Tour Guide's New, GPS/WiFi Enabled, Video Travel App for iPhone and iPod Finds Everything For You in Hawaii--Even the Public Restrooms!: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Bad News for Antsy Travelers at Pololu Valley; Tour Guide's New, GPS/WiFi Enabled, Video Travel App for iPhone and iPod Finds Everything For You in Hawaii--Even the Public Restrooms!: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Hiking into Pololu Valley

Violent, lush, wild; the north end of Hawai’i Island is as varied and exciting as it is unexpected. At the end of the highway are the Pololu Valley Overlook and the trail leading down to Pololu Beach. This is one of the most untamed, beautiful spots in the tropical Pacific and should not be missed. The trail down to the beach drops 400 feet in 20 minutes of hiking—be warned, the hike up is difficult for those not in good physical shape and the hike down should not be attempted if you have doubts about being able to hike back up.

Approaching Storm at Pololu Valley; Due to Frequent Rain Squalls Off the Pacific Ocean, Rain Gear is Highly Recommended For This Hike: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Approaching Storm at Pololu Valley; Due to Frequent Rain Squalls Off the Pacific Ocean, Rain Gear is Highly Recommended For This Hike: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Trail to Pololu Beach is dusty when dry, muddy when wet and a running creek in the rain.  Try to minimize trail erosion by staying on the trail, walking on rocks where possible and not cutting switchbacks: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Trail to Pololu Beach is dusty when dry, muddy when wet and a running creek in the rain. Try to minimize trail erosion by staying on the trail, walking on rocks where possible and not cutting switchbacks: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Pololu Valley Itself is Private Land so Stay Close To the Beach: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Pololu Valley Itself is Private Land so Stay Close To the Beach: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The valley itself is private land, so stay close to the beach. The best place to cross the stream is usually about 80-120 feet inland and during either slack or high tide; spend a few minutes to find the stone ford for an easier crossing.

The Beach at Pololu Valley.  The Channel Here Between Hawaii and Maui Has The Third Highest Discharge of Water in the World, Behind the Bay of Fundy and the Straights of Magellan.  Because of the Unbelievable Ocean Currents This Generates, and Strong Rip Tides, We Do Not Recommend Swimming or Surfing at Pololu: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Beach at Pololu Valley. The Channel Here Between Hawaii and Maui Has The Third Highest Discharge of Water in the World, Behind the Bay of Fundy and the Straights of Magellan. Because of the Unbelievable Ocean Currents This Generates, and Strong Rip Tides, We Do Not Recommend Swimming or Surfing at Pololu: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Slow Running Stream in Pololu Valley is Rarely High Enough To Cut Through the Storm Berm; Therefore These Dry, Back Dunes Are The Best Place to Cross the Beach: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Slow Running Stream in Pololu Valley is Rarely High Enough To Cut Through the Storm Berm; Therefore These Dry, Back Dunes Are The Best Place to Cross the Beach: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The beach is not usually swimmable due to the violent surf and ocean currents, but makes a wonderful place to picnic and contemplate the awesome power and violence of nature.

Although It's Tempting to Explore, the Lush Meadows of the Interior of Pololu Valley Are Annoyingly Boggy AND Privately Owned: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Although It's Tempting to Explore, the Lush Meadows of the Interior of Pololu Valley Are Annoyingly Boggy AND Privately Owned: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

For the adventurous, the hike down to Pololu Valley may not be enough—for them may we suggest further hiking in this lightly-traveled area. Pololu is the starting point for over 40 miles of interconnecting tails, as well as the Kohala Ditch. Trails in this area are steep, unmaintained, crumbling and frequently quite slick, so caution is advised, particularly on hillslopes and in the rain, when trails may turn into streambeds and hillsides into waterfalls.

The hike over intervening ridges east into Honokane Nui Valley and Honokane Iki Valley provides spectacular views of this untamed, but private land. Climbing 600 muddy feet over the ridge, the trail then drops breathtakingly down to the valley floor. Before the stream, the trail divides at a bamboo grove—if you are proceeding on to Honokane Iki, follow the fork to the right through the bamboo, otherwise go left on to the wonderful, lonely, private, boulder beach.

Looking Back West Across Pololu Beach From the Start of the Honokane Nui Valley Trail: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Looking Back West Across Pololu Beach From the Start of the Honokane Nui Valley Trail: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Along the Honokane Nui Trail, Climbing East Out Of Pololu Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Along the Honokane Nui Trail, Climbing East Out Of Pololu Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Going on farther east into Honokane Iki Valley from Honokane Nui is very rewarding and easier than the hop from Pololu to Honokane Nui, climbing just 400 muddy feet over the ridge. There are numerous ruins from previous eras of population, ancient to recent, to explore in both these valleys. It is possible to wander the intersecting, disappearing, maddening trails all the way into Waipi’o Valley, 14 canyons and about 15 bushwhacking, stream-fording, slope-slipping, rain-slogging, breathtaking, aggravating, wonderful miles away. This is definitely a trip for more than a single day and permission must be gained to cross the private land.

The Beach at Pololu Valley From the Ridge Between Pololu and Honokane Iki Valleys: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Beach at Pololu Valley From the Ridge Between Pololu and Honokane Iki Valleys: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Under no circumstances should the hiker be seduced by the thought of an easy return back into Pololu Valley by skirting the headlands along the ocean. This is longer and much more difficult than it appears and has proven fatal to the unwary.

During the Wet Season The Stream in Pololu Valley Turns Into a Seasonal Lake: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

During the Wet Season The Stream in Pololu Valley Turns Into a Seasonal Lake: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Bart Hunt at Pololu--Numerous Squall and Storms Coming Off the Ocean Make the Weather at Pololu Very Exciting: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Bart Hunt at Pololu--Numerous Squall and Storms Coming Off the Ocean Make the Weather at Pololu Very Exciting: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Bring good insect repellent and wear hiking boots, with tabis in your pack for stream fording and beach walking. Stream water in the valleys is infected with leptospirosis bacteria, so bring plenty of water (at least two liters per person) in your pack. A camera is a must and due to frequent squalls off the ocean, rain gear is highly recommended.

Bart Hunt at Pololu Valley--The Trail Back Up Out of The Valley Seems Much Longer and Steeper than On the Way Down; Be Sure To Leave Plenty Of Time and Energy To Climb Back Up: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Bart Hunt at Pololu Valley--The Trail Back Up Out of The Valley Seems Much Longer and Steeper than On the Way Down; Be Sure To Leave Plenty Of Time and Energy To Climb Back Up: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

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A Sweeping View of Magnificent Pololu Valley: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

A Sweeping View of Magnificent Pololu Valley: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.