Skip navigation

Tag Archives: dolphin

by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kua Bay Family-Style Beach, Kohala Coast Hawaii: Graphic From Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track.  Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Kua Bay Beach

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Lovely Kua Bay, North of Kailua Kona, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The site of Kona’s newest beach park, this is a lovely white sand beach, Kua Bay, is also called Manini’owali. Although there is no shade to speak of, but the the swimming and boogie boarding in the crystalline waters is primo, as is cliff-jumping from the rocks offshore. Snorkeling the clear, turquoise ocean along the rocks to the north is excellent until the surf or wind picks up. Strong currents and large waves call for respect, here; so if the surf is up, don’t go in. Also, sometimes in winter the surf removes the sand to offshore, leaving a rocky shelf that is less fun to frolic on than the sandy beach.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Even with explanded parking, it can be crowded at Kua Bay, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kua Bay access road can be found north of Kailua Kona between mile markers 88 and 89 on the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway. The turn is directly across the highway from the better-signed turn to the Veterans Cemetery. Remember that although the park is closed and the gate is locked on Wednesdays, you can still hike in, although it’s about a mile.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kua Bay from the North, Kohala Coast, Hawaii Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There are no lifeguards at Kua Bay, so you swim at your own risk. Also, there is little or no shade here, and the sun can be intense, even on a cloudy day. Be sure to bring lots of sunblock, a long-sleeved shirt for after sunning, sunglasses and perhaps even a beach umbrella; remember to drink more water than you think you need while on the beach. So many visitors do not understand the ferocity of the Hawaii sun and wind-up getting a vacation-ruining sunburn; don’t let that happen to you. Read more about sunburn and sunblocks for Hawaii here, and about appropriate sunglasses for Hawaii, here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kua Bay Sun Worshipers, Kohala Coast Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Behind the beach on the north end is a small, inviting fresh-water pool. Don’t be seduced into rinsing off here—it is bottomed by foul-smelling quicksand and is extremely nasty if you jump in. There are sacred, native Hawai’ian sites and ruins to the north of the beach; please do not disturb them.

Behind the beach on the north end is a small, inviting fresh-water pool. Don’t be seduced into rinsing off here—it is bottomed by foul-smelling quicksand and is extremely nasty if you jump in. There are sacred, native Hawai’ian sites and ruins to the north of the beach; please do not disturb them.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Hidden jewell Kua Bay is tucked secretly away in the basalt and bunch grass scablands of the Kohala Coast, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A short hike from the access road brings one to the summit of Pu’u Ku’ili, a 342-foot high cinder cone. A romantic spot to watch sunsets and whales, it boasts a majestic view of the Kohala coastline. As of this writing, mountain biking along the trail up Pu’u Ku’ili is tolerated by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources. The ride up is short but sweaty, but the blast down is well worth the effort. However, one must be careful to stay on the trail and be wary of tearing up the fragile plants; the erosion which inevitably follows such abuse will quickly ruin this wonderful little pu’u. Because of the actions of some inconsiderate, ignorant and careless mountain bikers and off-road motor-bikers, access to riding this cinder cone may shortly be curtailed—so please be mindful of this when riding the trails.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Fun in the surf at Kua Bay, Kohala Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

It is possible to hike along the shoreline Ala Ali’i (Way of the Kings) to Makalawena Beach, just to the south. The hike is enjoyable and takes about an hour and half, but there is no potable fresh water for drinking or rinsing off with along the way. About half-way along this hike is a marvelous cove which makes for a remarkably isolated camp. However, be sure you are prepared for any eventuality, to hike to the road either at Kua Bay or the main Kekaha Kai State Park facilities is rough and tortuous in the dark. Read more about camping in this area, here.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Watching the whales at Kua Bay, Kohala Coast, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Access to Kua Bay is via a road so newly paved road it’s on few maps or GPS databases. Park facilities include parking, picnic tables, restrooms and water. Wild goats are frequently seen in this area as are dolphin, turtles and whales in season. Remember there is no lifeguard.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Kua Bay on a Lazy Afternoon, Kohala Coast, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Delightful Kua Bay can get a bit breezy in the afternoon, Kohala Coast, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Cooling Off at Kua Bay, Kohala Coast Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Coming to my island for a vacation? There are three things I always recommend the first-time visitor do. First, get in the air. Secondly–go to a luau. Finally, I advise people of every age to get in the water and go snorkeling. You will find your mind going back to that experience over and over through the years much more so than many of your other travel experiences.   Part I of this series discuses Snorkeling Gear; Part II of this series will discuss Snorkeling Technique and Part III will cover Snorkeling Safety; Part V of the series will cover snorkel spots on the Big Island.

Photo by Donald MacGowan

Gary Burton and his duaghter snorkel at Hounaunau Bay: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Now, let’s talk a moment about snorkeling etiquette and protecting the reef and the animals who live there.

Please do not feed the fish, it disrupts their natural feeding habits and you may be injured. Reef fish are territorial and do occasionally “nip” but you should not chase, harass or touch them (this includes octopi). The oils on your fingers will injure their skin and they may carry diseases which they can pass to you on your hands. For photographing reef fish, whether snorkeling or scuba diving, simply find a feeding spot (usually a boulder or dead coral head teeming with algae, and wait calmly and silently nearby. They will slowly begin to check you out and if you can remain still long enough, eventually surround you leading to excellent photos and a very memorable experience.

Snorkeling etiquette calls for protecting not only the reef animals, but also the fragile corals growing on the reef. Corals, actually colonies of very small animals, take hundreds of years to form the structures visible today; they feed, shelter and provide habitats for other reef animals.  Coral reefs also protect the lagoons and shoreline from waves and sand erosion. Corals are at the very root of Hawai’ian history and culture; the Hawaiian creation chant places the origin of life in the sea, beginning with a coral polyp.

Simply touching corals to see what they feel like can cause the death of an entire colony. Oils from your skin can disturb the delicate mucous membranes which protect the animals from disease. Please don’t walk upon or stand on coral, as this can kill the living coral polyps which, as the builders of the entire reef structure, are the very foundation of the reef ecosystem. Sunscreen washing off your body can kill coral; wear a t-shirt and a swim cap for UV protection and put your sunscreen on AFTER you come out of the water.

Called Honu by Hawaii’s natives, the Hawaiian Green Sea turtle is beautiful, serene and seeming wise. Though they have swum the oceans for over 200 million years, peacefully feeding on algae and invertebrates, this highly successful product of amphibian evolution is in grave danger. Loss of habitat, hunting and molestation by humans has conspired to push the Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle to the very verge of extinction.

Photo by Donald MacGowan

Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle at Papakolea Beach: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Protected now by state and federal law, the population of once millions of individuals has been decimated to just a few hundred thousand; although they are making a comeback, Hawaii’s honu are still very much endangered.

Do not approach basking turtles closely, never touch or pick them up. Harassing turtles carries a stiff fine and in any case, touching the turtle is a good way to get a raging salmonella infection. If honu are swimming near where you are, do not approach or chase them; always swim to the side of them, never above (as a predatory shark would) nor below them (so they won’t feel that their soft belly is at risk).

Anyone who observes their beauty and grace underwater easily understands why the Hawai’ians base their word for “peace”, “honua”, on their name for the green sea turtle, “honu”.

Although harder for the snorkeler to approach, but certainly no less in danger of molestation are the marine mammals: dolphin, seals and whales. In general, it is illegal, dangerous and generally a bad idea to approach marine mammals within 100 yards; 300 yards for females with calves. Dolphins and seals, in particular, may choose to approach you-just remember, this ain’t “Flipper”-these are wild animals and they bite. Hard. If approached, remain calm (absolutely entranced, of course, but calm); do not approach any young animals and do not reach out to them as they may interpret this as aggression on your part and possibly bite. Male seals may exhibit dominant behavior and have been know to *ahem* mount swimmers. Avoid these unpleasantries by observing and enjoying these animals from a distance.  About whales…uh, wait a minute…if there is anybody out there crazy enough to swim out into the open ocean and harass a 60,000 pound animal with a mouth twice the size of a king-size bed, nothing I say is going to stop them…just use some common sense, OK?  Leave them alone—besides…it’s the law.

And now a word about sharks–two words, actually: “Don’t Worry”.  There’s good news and bad news about sharks in Hawaii–first the bad news: if you are in water deeper than your knees, you are probably within 200 yards of a shark.  The good news?  You will never know it.  The truth is that you are not likely to see or encounter a shark…period.  Tens of millions of people swim Hawaii every year without seeing so much as a dorsal fin break the water. Don’t worry–you are not what they eat (so you won’t attract them) and generally, they are more afraid of you than you are of them.  To dispel visitor’s apprehensions about sharks, the Hawaiian Tourism Bureau used to advertise that tourists were more likely to get hit on the head by a falling coconut than bitten by a shark…but they decided THAT was not a real cheery statistic to crow about, either.  In reality, there are only about three shark bites a year in Hawaii—which is amazing considering there are hundreds of thousands of people in the water, all day, every day of the year.

Photograph by Donnie MacGowan

A cloud of raccoon butterfly fish at Kahalu'u Beach: Photograph by Donnie MacGowan

Having said that, bear in mind that all sharks demand respect and there are several things you can do to make yourself generally safer in any shark encounter.  Number one safety tip is: avoid them.  Sharks are stealth hunters and in any conditions where they are obscured in the water, they will hunt. Therefore–do not go into the water until at least an hour after dawn, be out of the water by about 4 pm; do not enter the water if it is murky; avoid stream mouths.  Obey beach closures; obey warnings from the Lifeguards.  Little sharks don’t get to be big sharks unless they pay strict attention to avoiding whoever is bigger than they are–small sharks generally will glide silently away from you without you ever having known they were there.  Big sharks are different.  They may approach you.

The most common conventional wisdom you hear is: if you are being stalked or approached, swim purposefully, not panicked, away from the shark at an angle.  Do not swim at high speed straight from him, it will trigger his predator-prey response and he’ll chase you.  Do not splash excessively; this sounds like a dying fish (i.e., dinner) to sharks. Remember that the larger sharks eat sea turtles…to a shark hunting below you, your outline paddling on a surfboard or boogie board, looks remarkably like a sea turtle.  When you approach the water, seeing three or four sea turtles sunning themselves on the beach is normal; seeing twenty or thirty indicates that something very large and hungry is hunting the water nearby.  The presence of dolphin nearby is no guarantee there are not also sharks nearby.

There are hundreds of bits of advice for surviving shark attacks from hundreds of shark experts and attack survivors from all over the world—I will not pass these on to you for two reasons.  First and foremost, I am a not a shark expert; secondly, I have never needed any of them because I have followed these sensible rules for years and have never, not once, seen a shark while snorkeling.  I’m out there 4 or five days a week, year round.  You won’t see one either.  Relax and enjoy your snorkeling…as I said…don’t worry.

Finally–many people ask “What’s the etiquette for, um–er–answering nature’s call?”  Easy–for wet stuff, just swim a bit away from people and let go, maybe maintaining forward momentum so as not to create a “cloud”.  No, this isn’t why the ocean is salty.  For solid stuff, get your partner and both of you swim in and get out, visit the rest room.  No exceptions for that.

Part I of this series discuses Snorkeling Gear; Part II of this series will discuss Snorkeling Technique and Part III will cover Snorkeling Etiquette; Part IV of the series covers Snorkeling Safety and Part V will cover Big Island Snorkel Spots.

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general, and beach activities on the Big Island in particular, visit http://.tourguidehawaii.com and http://tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.  For information about the author, go here.

Reprinted from here.

Point Forecast: Kailua Kona HI
19.63N -155.95W (Elev. 1217 ft)

Last Update: 7:37 pm HST Jun 14, 2008
Forecast Valid: 6am HST Jun 15, 2008-6pm HST Jun 21, 2008
Forecast at a Glance
Today

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 80°F
Tonight

Haze
Haze

Lo 67°F

Monday

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 81°F
Monday
Night

Haze
Haze

Lo 67°F

Tuesday

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 82°F
Tuesday
Night

Haze
Haze

Lo 68°F

Wednesday

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 82°F
Wednesday
Night

Haze
Haze

Lo 68°F

Thursday

Scattered Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 30%
Scattered
Showers
Hi 81°F
Detailed text forecast
Hazardous weather condition(s):

Today: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 80. West wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Tonight: Widespread haze. Mostly clear, with a low around 67. East wind around 7 mph.

Monday: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. West wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Monday Night: Widespread haze. Mostly clear, with a low around 67. South wind around 6 mph.

Tuesday: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 82. West wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Tuesday Night: Widespread haze. Mostly clear, with a low around 68. South wind around 6 mph.

Wednesday: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 82. West wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Wednesday Night: Widespread haze. Mostly clear, with a low around 68. East wind around 7 mph.

Thursday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 81. West wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Thursday Night: Isolated showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 67. East wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Friday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 82. West wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Friday Night: Isolated showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 68. East wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Saturday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 82. West wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%.


For more information on visiting Hawaii in general and touring the Big Island in particular, please go here and here.