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by Donald B. MacGowan

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pele statue, Volcano Art Center, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Volcano Art Center

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Volcano Art Center, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

A National Park may seem an incongruous place for a world-class art gallery, but the Volcano Art Center has perhaps the best collection of art for sale in the State of Hawai’i. The Volcano Art Center, originally built in 1877 as the Volcano House Inn and moved to its present location in 1941, is itself an exquisite work of art, built of ohi’a and koa woods.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Volcano Art Center in and of itself is a work of art, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Inside you will find many one-of-a-kind works in all media: oil, pottery, metal, watercolor, glass, wood, jewelry, you name it. The Center also offers programs of dance, theater and music, as well as providing workshop and studio space to artists in residence. It’s a great place to come and browse, see what is going on in the fascinating world of Hawai’ian Art.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Many types of art are for sale in the Volcano Art Center, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html.

The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.
>For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.
All media copyright 2010 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Inside the Volcano Art Center, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

by Donald B. MacGowan

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sacred Ki'i Guard the Place of Refuge at Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Whether you visit the Big Island for a few days, a couple weeks or a few months, you want to make the most of your time in Paradise. With such a wide variety of natural and commercial attractions, it is natural for the visitor to get a little overwhelmed in the “Option Overload” and not be able to make a balanced and informed decision on what they want to do and how best to spend their time.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pu'u Honua O Honaunau, the Place of Refuge, As Seen from Two-Step Snorkeling Beach, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Even choosing which beach you want to spend time on, or where you want to hike can be an exercise in confusion and conflicting advice.  Clearly, visitors to Hawaii could use help making quality decisions about how best to spend their time.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sacred Ki'i at Pu'u Honua O Honaunau, the Place of Refuge. The "Kona Style" of Polynesian Wood Carving is Considered Among the Best in the World and These Sacred Iki are Fine Examples, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Tour Guide Hawaii is excited and proud to announce the release of their new GPS/WiFi enabled App for iPhone and iPod that helps you navigate your trip to Hawaii with hours of informative, location-aware video and information. Although our video guide will lead you to dozens of unusual, untamed and unspoiled spots, let’s look at what may be Hawaii’s most spiritual, historically important and beautiful attraction, Pu’u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park, and highlight just a bit of the information you might not be able to find from maps and guidebooks that could otherwise cause you to miss some very interesting places and amazing sights if you did not have Tour Guide Hawaii’s new App.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park Entrance, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Pu’u Honua O Hounaunau National Historic Park: The Place of Refuge

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Hale O' Keawe Heiau and Keone'ele, Pu'u Honua O' Hounaunau National Historic Park: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Introduction: Writing about the Place of Refuge in 1889, Robert Louis Stevenson said: “There are times and places where the past becomes more vivid than the present, and the memory dominates the ear and eye…”

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Royal Fishpond, Place of Refuge, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Easily the most beautiful, peaceful and restful spot in all the Hawai’ian Islands, Pu’u Honua O Honaunau is a place of ease and regeneration for even the most weary and jaded soul. Of enormous historical and cultural significance, the sacred grounds at Honaunau are the best-preserved and largest remaining Pu’u Honua, or Place of Refuge, complex in Hawai’i. It is also a wonderful area to wander, swim, hike, snorkel, relax, picnic or SCUBA dive

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sacred Ki'i Guard Secrets as Old as Hawaii Itself, Pu'u Honua O Honaunau, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Samuel Clemens and Kamehameha III passed many days in idle chat along the Great Wall of Honaunau; one can still sit upon the rock where they reclined and see the holes bored into the lava to support poles for awnings. For anyone who had any doubts about what Old Hawai’i was like, a trip to Honaunau will fill your imagination, your camera and your soul.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Hale o Keawe and Temple Precincts, Place of Refuge, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The Place of Refuge: A complex and strict order of law, known as the kapu system, controlled and governed everything in ancient Hawai’i from the order of crop rotation to proper sexual relations, what fish may be caught and in what season, what foods could be eaten by women and proper respect for the royalty (for instance, it was to break kapu for men and women to eat together, for women to eat pork or bananas, or for commoners to look upon the king or to step upon ground he had trod). Under the kapu law system, punishment for any transgression was swift and severe: immediate death by stabbing, clubbing, strangulation, drowning or burning. There was no appeal and no recourse; judgment was immediate and final.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Path from the Temple Grounds to the Royal Precincts, Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Unless the accused could escape to one of the designated heiau at a place of refuge. Once there, the accused would undergo a cleansing ceremony by the kahuna and would be absolved of all crimes and allowed to return to his family and previous life, free of onus. Women, children and the infirm also took refuge at the Pu’u Honua in times of war, as did vanquished warriors wishing to submit to the winning chief. Not often mentioned, however, is the grisly sport the king’s men sometimes made of the unfortunate accused, chasing them across sharp a’a fields, through the surf, over mountains, toying with their victims only to butcher them upon the Refuges’ outer wall, seeming seconds from salvation. This too, was sanctioned by the law.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

A Passage Through The Massive Wall of Honaunau, Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The complex at Pu’u Honua O Honaunau, established as a National Historical Park in 1961, is vast, well preserved and pervaded by a soul-filling peace. Down the center of the complex runs the Wall of Honaunau, 100 feet long, 10 feet tall and 17 feet thick. It separated the palace grounds of the Ali’ from the temple grounds of the Pu’u Honua. The wall was made without mortar or dressing the stones and has survived for over 500 years.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Dry-Stack Masonry Employed by the Ancient Hawaiians, Using No Mortar, Has Survived Over Half a Millenium of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Volcanoes With No Apparent Damage: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

The royal residence area includes the canoe landing at Keone’ele Cove, Heleipolala Fishpond, several reconstructed residences and a canoe hale as well as the famous Hale Keawe, where the iwi (bones) of as many as 23 Ali’i ancestors of Kamehameha were once stored and venerated.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The 'Ale'ale'a Athletic Field, Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

On the grounds of the refuge itself stands the stone platform, ‘Ale’ale’a, which was used for sports, the Keoua Stone, legendary resting place of the Ali’i and the Ka’ahumanu Stone, where it is said the favorite wife of Kamehameha the Great hid after quarrels with her husband.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

An Ocean View Through Waiuohina Lava Tube View, Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Leading south out of the refuge is the 1871 Trail, so named because area residence paid their 1871 taxes by improving and maintaining it. This trail leads to many important archeological sites such as the Ki’ilae Village, ‘Oma’o Heiau, Alahaka Heiau, Keokua Holua and the Waiuohina Lava tube.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sunset in the Vog Cast an Eerie Light on this Sacred Iki, Place of Refuge, Honaunau, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here. For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

iPhone and iPod Touch Video Tour Guide for Hawaii-fully GPS and WiFi enabled, fully interactive. Hours of interesting and compelling content. Available from iTunes or at www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Place of Refuge, Pu'u Honua O Hounaunau National Historic Park, From Across Honaunau Bay, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

A National Park may seem an incongruous place for a world-class art gallery, but the Volcano Art Center has perhaps the best collection of art for sale in the State of Hawaii. The Volcano Art Center, originally built in 1877 as the Volcano House Inn and moved to its present location in 1941, is itself an exquisite work of art, built of ohia and koa woods. Inside you will find many one-of-a-kind works in all media: oil, pottery, metal, watercolor, glass, wood, jewelry, you name it. The Center also offers programs of dance, theater and music, as well as providing workshop and studio space to artists in residence. Its a great place to come and browse, see what is going on in the fascinating world of Hawaiian Art.

Produced by Donald B. MacGowan; videography by Frank Burgess and Donald MacGowan; Narrated by Frank Burgess, Original music written and performed by Donnie MacGowan. All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan.

For more information about traveling the Big Island in general and exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.


Carving of a Honu, Green Sea Turtle, at Pu’u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Carving of a Honu, Green Sea Turtle, at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan
    

by Donnie MacGowan


Lost in the dreaming mists of time are the origins and meanings of Hawaiian petroglyphs, the carved rock art of the ancient Hawaiians. Are they religious symbols or hunting magic? Accounts of journeys and conquests? No one is certain, as no historical records exist and those kahuna who knew the meaning of their magic took those secrets to their grave.

Anthropomorphic Petroglyph from, the Makaole’a Beach, Kona: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Anthropomorphic Petroglyph from, the Makaole'a Petroglyph Field Near Kailua Kona, HI: Photo by Donnie MacGowan     

Like most animists, Hawaiíians invested worship and respect in, and intuited spiritual powers to, a range of natural objects and phenomena: rain, volcanic eruptions, the sea, sharks, fresh water springs, surf and individual rocks. Pohaku O Kane, or sacred rocks, were among the most common spiritual objects of worship, whether they were naturally occurring in the landscape (pohakuia loa), rocks set on platforms (pohaku amakua), carved rocks (pohaku iki) or the petroglyphs themselves (k'i'i pohaku).

Petroglyphs from Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

 

 

 

 

Petroglyphs from Pu'u Loa Field, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan     

Most petroglyphs in the Hawaiian Islands are found in fields, on broad expanses of smooth pahoehoe basalt which would have facilitated both carving the images as well as gatherings of celebrants, were they later used in sacred rituals. The biggest petroglyph fields are found on the island of Hawaii, with the field at Pu'u Loa in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park being the largest petroglyph field in all of Polynesia. In addition to the various petroglyph fields, smaller scattered groups and lone carvings are known throughout the Hawaiian Islands. A black market exists in stolen petroglyphs and these lone petroglyphs, although many are well known and documented, are becoming increasingly hard to protect from thieves. Heartbreakingly, most of the targeted petroglyphs are destroyed as ignorant thieves try to pry, hammer and chip them away from their native stone.


Elaborate Anthropomorphic Carving from Pu'u Loa Petroglyph Field: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan
Elaborate Anthropomorphic Carving from Pu'u Loa Petroglyph Field: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Although the age of the petroglyphs is difficult to determine, a stylistic evolution is clearly evident and can even be relatively dated where more recent petroglyphs are carved directly on top of older ones. The styles start with simple stick figures and crude geometric shapes and evolve into more humanoid figures with triangular chests. Carvings with elaborate headdresses and complex geometric designs came later and carvings of horses, cattle and European sailing vessels are the most recent and certainly post-date European contact. There are many petroglyphs which seem to defy even these simple classifications and are so stylistically unique that scholars argue whether they represent some variant art form that flourished briefly and died, or are a more modern carving by contemporary artists.
Simple Geometric Carving from Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donnie MacGowan
Simple Geometric Carving from Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A More Complex Geometric Carving from Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donnie MacGowan
A More Complex Geometric Carving from Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Quite Complex Geometric Petroglyph, Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan
Quite Complex Geometric Petroglyph, Pu'u Loa: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan
    

Puako Petroglyph Field

The right hand raised in this figure from Puako Petroglyph Field may indicate the compass direction "North West": Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A Standing Figure from Puako Petroglyph Field; Many Authorities Believe the Raised Right Hand Signifies the Hawaiian Primary Geographic Direction We Call "North-west": Photo by Donnie MacGowan


This enormous field of over 1200 individual carvings makes you wonder why ancient Hawaiíians made their tortuous way across miles of inhospitable lava desert, far from any source of water and through thick keawe forest to leave their enigmatic and cryptic petroglyphs on this singular Pahoehoe lava flow. Carved between 1000 and 1800c.e., the Puako Petroglyph Field is the second largest field of ancient petroglyphs in Polynesia. Lying near the grounds of the Mauna Lani Resort, they are accessed today by a simple, 25-minute walk on the wide, easy Malama Trail. The meaning and message of these petroglyphs have never been divined, but in addition to the stone pictures, are numerous piko, small holes bored into the lava to accept an infantís umbilical cord during the religious birth ceremonies.

Puako has offered at least one clue in unraveling the enigma of Hawaiian petroglyphs. Based upon thousands of measurements and careful mapping, it is believed by most scholars that the human figure, with his right hand raised, indicates the Hawaiian principal compass direction, which we would call "Northwest" (see picture).

To get to the Malama Petroglyph Field turn into the grounds of the Mauna Lani Resort between the 73 and 74 mile markers and follow the signs to the parking lot for the trail to the Malama Petroglyph Trail. The best time to view the petroglyphs is just after dawn of just before dusk, because the angle of the sunlight accentuates the carvings. Due to their fragility and antiquity, rubbings and casting of the petroglyphs are forbidden. Full facilities, water and food are available at the resort.

Makaole'a Beach Petroglyph Field

European-Style Sailing Ship Petroglyph at Ke'eku Heiau, Keauhou Historic District: Photo by Donald MacGowan


European-Style Sailing Ship Petroglyph at Ke'eku Heiau, Keauhou Historic District: Photo by Donald MacGowan     

A small, forgotten beach along Aliíi Drive in front of the recently demolished Kona Lagoon Hotel, Makaoleía Beach has wonderful tidepools but poor swimming. Due to its relative isolation in the midst of town, this beach has a very lonely feel and makes a great place for a private picnic. The numerous petroglyphs lie both above and below the surface of the ocean and are only visible at low tide, to the south and west, seaward, perhaps a hundred meters from the reconstructed Keíeku Heiau. The petroglyphs were all carved on basalt above sea level; over the millennia the sheer weight of Hawaiíi Island has caused it to slowly subside, and the petroglyphs to be partially submerged. Am example of an authentic, but relatively recent, carving is a large petroglyph clearly depicting a European-style sailing vessel. Other famous petroglyphs from this field include the depiction of the headless Maui Aliíi Kamalalawalu, after he lost his battle for the Island of Hawaii to the victorious Hawaii Aliíi, Lonoikamakakahiki as well as an anatomically ìsuper-anatomically correctî carving of Lonoikamakakahiki, himself.

To reach Makaoleía Beach, park either in the Kahaluíu Beach Park or at Keauhou Outrigger Beach Resort. From Kahaluíu, walk onto the Keauhou Resort property through the gateway in the fence between them and follow the asphalt path to the pool deck, through the lobby of the resort and join the paved path that runs along the end of the Resort driveway. From the Resort parking lot, walk up the drive to the paved path that runs along the end of the driveway. Following this path, one passes Punawai Spring first, then, the Moío Twins homesite. Continuing on past reconstructed Hapaialíi Heiau around the margin of a large tidepool to reconstructed Keíeku Heiau, Makaoleía Beach runs south from the end of Keíeku Heiau. No services.

Pu'u Loa Petroglyph Field

A Few of the More Than 15,000 Individual Petroglyphs at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

A Few of the More Than 15,000 Individual Petroglyphs at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Just off Hawaii Volcanoes National Parkís Chain of Craters Road, along the side of the centuries-old Kaíu-Puna trail, worn smooth by generations of travelers, in the area of the Hill of Long Life (Puíu Loa) lies the largest petroglyph field in Polynesia It is estimated that the Puíu Loa field contains in excess of 15,000 carvings. A one mile segment of this ancient trail, from the parking lot along the Chain of Craters Road to the petroglyphs, has been marked with cairns (or ìahuî) by the Park staff to lead visitors to the petroglyphs. As you hike along this trail, notice the smoothness of the lava, the sheen on the trail worn by generations of travelers' feet.     

There are many theories concerning the origin and meanings of these carvings but one thing is certain. People stopped here for hundreds of years and left their mark on the stone. Among the designs are simple holes, spirals, concentric circles, human forms and others which are unrecognizable geometric shapes. The hills and swales of pahoehoe surrounding the boardwalk contain thousands more petroglyphs, but due to their fragility, you are advised to remain on the boardwalk to keep from damaging them.

Remember that these carvings, though many hundreds of years old, are extremely fragile so remain on the boardwalkódo not step into the petroglyph field, even for a better view, or onto the carvings themselves. The boardwalk passes by hundreds of carvings near enough for you to examine them minutely and photograph the completely. This self-guided tour takes about 1 hour.

South Point Petroglyphs

Kite Petroglyphs at South Point; An Academic Debate Exists on the Age and Origin of the Carvings: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Kite Petroglyphs at South Point; An Academic Debate Exists on the Age and Origin of the Carvings: Photo by Donald MacGowan     

Unlike the three previous examples, there is no large petroglyph field at South PointÖcarvings are spread on rocks and in tidepools and lava tubes all up and down the coastline. There are several that are associated with the small, but extremely well-preserved Kalalae Heiau near the actual geographic South Point. Kalalae is classified as a koía, or fishing shrine, to the god Ku'ula.

There are several outstanding examples of Pohaku O Kane other than petroglyphs evident at Kalalae Heiau that one should note. On the main platform outside the heiau is a pohaku amakua referred to as ìKumaieaî which means ìfemaleî. On the smaller stone terrace just north is another standing stone, associated with the god Kanaloa, and referred to as ìKanemakuaî (male). The stone inside the walls is a called ìKuíulaî after the Hawaiian god of fishing; north of the structure stand Makaunulau (a Hawaiian navigational star) and 'Ai'ai (his ward), south is Wahine hele ("place from where the women leave"). Examples of pohakuia loa include the Pohakuwaía Kauhi (literally ìcanoe rock by the shrubsî) right at the shoreline, which was used to focus meditations before long canoes journeys, and Pohakuokeau (ìstone of the currentsî or ìstone of the yearsî), which stands offshore. The name Pohakuokeau reflects the Hawaiian belief that the stones would turn over when there was a political change in government.

K'i'i pohaku in the area are numerous but scattered, so it's up to the initiative and energy of the visitor to find them. True curiosities, the kite petroglyphs, are in a large Queenís Bath and easily located by walking east and south along the shore from Kalalae Heiau. These carvings are so stylistically unique to other Hawaiian petroglyphs that scholars are unsure of their origins. Do they represent some variant, and apparently rare, art form, or are they modern carvings by a recent artist? Even the associated archeological features and artifacts in the area feed this ambiguity. For instance, in the immediate area there are several pohakuia loa (rocks naturally standing in the area used for worship) and pohaku iki (carved rocks that generally have been stood-up) that are thought to be authentic. However, a large stone ìaltarî adjacent to the pool containing the kites is not only very unusual stylistically from other known Hawaiian features, but may actually be a modern construction and represent nothing more than a ìbenchî made by local fishermen. Additionally, a short distance nearby but away from shore, in a large lava tube with a freshwater spring used for diving by locals, is a turtle petroglyph which seems to be another example of the same carving style as the kites. Modern or ancient?

South Point, or Ka Lae, is the farthest point south in the entire United States. The road to Ka Lae from the Hawaiíi Belt Road is infamous, but has been greatly improved in recent years, although itís still only 1-lane wide in many places. Turn south off the Hawaii Belt Road at the well-marked turn just north and west of Waiohinu Town.

Cryptic Carvings of Enigmatic Human Figures from Near Ke'eku, Kona HI: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Cryptic Carvings of Enigmatic Human Figures from Near Ke'eku, Kona HI: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan     

Petroglyphs; enigmatic, ancient and undeniably beautiful are abundantly scattered across the Hawaiian landscape. It requires only curiosity, time and enrgy to seek the out. Who knows, maybe youíll be the one to tease some morsel of meaning from these cryptic and ancient messages to the gods.


For more information on traveling the Hawaii in general and exploring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.


All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan.

 

Author, artist, poet, Aelbert Aehegma reads his poetic interpretation of the Kumulipo–the creation chant of the Polynesian peoples.

Aelbert M.C. Aehegma has been exhibited in over a dozen countries and major art cities, including New York City, Geneva, Paris, Washington D.C. and Honolulu. Countries his works have been exhibited in include Spain, New Zealand, Greece, France, Norway, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland and the U.S, as well as the First Art Show in Space aboard The MIR Space Station. His luminous, post-impressionist paintings and stone and wood sculptures are in notable private collections around the world; his works intrigue a broad section of art collectors. His works are included in collections as broad as the hostess of the Playboy Show on T.V. to President George W. Bush.

Aelbert is from a family of many generations of artists. His mission is to share the artist’s vision of man’s connection to nature, to share the simple beauty naturally within all nature including our own nature. His playful nature beings and the joy of life illuminating from his canvases is alive with myriad color affects, and bathed in light & love.

Aelbert’s current exhibits include Museo Angel Orensantz, Spain; American Express Tourism Center, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii; Hooked Art Gallery, Waimea, Hawaii; Artist-in-Residence, Kona Coast Resort, Hawaii; Artist-in-Residence at Tour Guide Hawaii (Sponsor), Hawaii.

He carves marble and other stones with some hand tools made by his great grandfather over two-hundred years ago, and used by generations in his family.

He has also worked with metal, wood and other materials. Currently, he is accepting commissions for murals for homes and businesses, as well as monumental indoor and outdoor friezes and sculptures.

Commissions are now being accepted for 2008-2009. Inquires are accepted. Please Call directly to 808 895-7107 Pacific Art Design. Complimentary Consultation and Appraisals are now being offered. To contact by E-mail: pacifictalent@yahoo.com.

Inquires for sample images of special genres such as seascapes, mountainscapes, lavascapes, etc. will be sent by e-mail if requested.

Commissions accepted include: single, couple or group portraits, boat and animal portraits, home, business and estate renderings.

Aelbert MC Aehegma and Tour Guide Hawaii cordially invite the public to his exhibit, Thursday-Saturday afternoons and evenings through May, 2008.

Internationally Exhibited Artist Aelbert Aehegma

Tour Guide Hawaii is sponsoring a showing by Internationally Exhibited artist Aelbert MC Aehegma at their rental shack on Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoons and evenings through the month of May. Tour Guide Hawaii, a local company and the industry leader in GPS-guided tours, is located n Ali’i Drive at the south end of Kailua Village in a coffee shack on the lawn in front of Huggo’s Restaurant (see map here). The artist will be available at the showings.

See www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com for more information on visiting Hawaii in general and the benefits of using Tour Guide for touring the Big Island in particular.

Produced by Donald B. MacGowan

Aelbert MC Aehegma and Tour Guide Hawaii cordially invite the public to his exhibit, Thursday-Saturday afternoons and evenings through May, 2008.

Internationally Exhibited Artist Aelbert Aehegma

Tour Guide Hawaii is sponsoring a showing by Internationally Exhibited artist Aelbert MC Aehegma at their rental shack on Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoons and evenings through the month of May. Tour Guide Hawaii, a local company and the industry leader in GPS-guided tours, is located n Ali’i Drive at the south end of Kailua Village in a coffee shack on the lawn in front of Huggo’s Restaurant (see map here). The artist will be available at the showings.

Aelbert M.C. Aehegma has been exhibited in over a dozen countries and major art cities, including New York City, Geneva, Paris, Washington D.C. and Honolulu. Countries his works have been exhibited in include Spain, New Zealand, Greece, France, Norway, Sweden, Italy, Switzerland and the U.S, as well as the First Art Show in Space aboard The MIR Space Station. His luminous, post-impressionist paintings and stone and wood sculptures are in notable private collections around the world; his works intrigue a broad section of art collectors. His works are included in collections as broad as the hostess of the Playboy Show on T.V. to President George W. Bush.

Aelbert is from a family of many generations of artists. His mission is to share the artist’s vision of man’s connection to nature, to share the simple beauty naturally within all nature including our own nature. His playful nature beings and the joy of life illuminating from his canvases is alive with myriad color affects, and bathed in light & love.

Aelbert’s current exhibits include Museo Angel Orensantz, Spain; American Express Tourism Center, Hilton Waikoloa Village, Hawaii; Hooked Art Gallery, Waimea, Hawaii; Artist-in-Residence, Kona Coast Resort, Hawaii; Artist-in-Residence at Tour Guide Hawaii (Sponsor), Hawaii.

He carves marble and other stones with some hand tools made by his great grandfather over two-hundred years ago, and used by generations in his family.

He has also worked with metal, wood and other materials. Currently, he is accepting commissions for murals for homes and businesses, as well as monumental indoor and outdoor friezes and sculptures.

Commissions are now being accepted for 2008-2009. Inquires are accepted. Please Call directly to 808 895-7107 Pacific Art Design. Complimentary Consultation and Appraisals are now being offered. To contact by E-mail: pacifictalent@yahoo.com.

Inquires for sample images of special genres such as seascapes, mountainscapes, lavascapes, etc. will be sent by e-mail if requested.

Commissions accepted include: single, couple or group portraits, boat and animal portraits, home, business and estate renderings.

More information on Internationally Exhibited Artist Aelbert MC Aehegma is available here. More information on Tour Guide Hawaii is available here and here.