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by Donald B. MacGowan

 

Afternoon sunlight makes the small kipuka at Alanui Kahiko glow, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan  New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

La Aloa Sunset Kailua Kona Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

There are many wondrous, enigmatic and fascinating attractions on the Big Island of Hawaii, some better known than others, many out of the way and generally off the beaten track. Tour Guide Hawaii has produced an encyclopedic collection of the most up-to-date information, presented as short GPS-cued videos, in an app downloadable to iPhone and iPod Touch that covers the entire Big Island, highlighting the popular and the uncrowded, the famous and the secluded, the adventurous and the relaxing.

Afternoon sunlight makes the small kipuka at Alanui Kahiko glow, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan  New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Moon over Kahalu'u Beach, Kona Hawaii: Graphic From Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Best About Planning Your Hawaii Trip

Hawaii Lava Flow Update: August 2010 Viewing of Kilauea Lava Flows at Kaplapana on the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/hawaii-lava-flow-update-august-2010-viewing-of-kilauea-lava-flows-at-kaplapana-on-the-big-island/

Lava Falls from Kilauea Volcano, near Kalapana, Hawaii, August 2010: Photograph by Donald B. MacGowan

Lava Falls from Kilauea Volcano, near Kalapana, Hawaii, August 2010: Photograph by Donald B. MacGowan

What To Pack And Take To Hawaii: What You Need, What You Want, What You Can Leave Out Of Your Luggage: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/07/13/what-to-pack-and-take-to-hawaii-what-you-need-what-you-want-what-you-can-leave-out-of-your-luggage/

Getting To Hawaii, Getting Around Hawaii, Getting the Most From Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/04/getting-to-and-getting-around-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Frank’s Guide to Pronouncing Hawaiian Words: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/07/01/franks-guide-to-pronouncing-the-hawaiian-langauge/

What sunglasses should I buy to go to Hawaii?: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/11/what-sunglasses-should-i-buy-to-go-to-hawaii/

Going to Hawaii? Let’s Chat about Sunburn and Sunscreen…: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/13/going-to-hawaii-lets-chat-about-sun-burn-and-sunscreen/

Afternoon sunlight makes the small kipuka at Alanui Kahiko glow, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan  New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Beautiful Waialea Beach, Kohala Coast Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Best Beaches on Hawaii

A Quick Guide to The Best Beaches of Hawaii Island: Sun, Surf, Solitude: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/25/the-top-beaches-of-hawaii-island/

Green, Black, White, Grey and Piebald: The Colored Sand Beaches of the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/10/bgreen-black-white-grey-and-piebald-the-colored-sand-beaches-of-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

The Best Beaches in Hawaii: Part 1, The Main Kohala Coast: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/03/the-best-beaches-in-hawaii-part-1-the-main-kohala-coast/

The Best Beaches in Hawaii: Part 2, The Kona and South Kohala Coasts: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/05/the-best-beaches-in-hawaii-part-2-the-kona-and-south-kohala-coasts/

Best Beaches in Hawaii: Part 3, Unusual, Uncrowded and Untamed Beaches of South Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/07/best-beaches-in-hawaii-part-3-unusual-uncrowded-and-untamed-beaches-of-south-hawaii/

Best Beaches in Hawaii: Part 4, Wilderness Beaches of the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/09/best-beaches-in-hawaii-part-4-wilderness-beaches-of-the-big-island/

Best Beaches in Hawaii Part 5–Best Beaches for Snorkeling: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/11/best-beaches-in-hawaii-part-5-best-beaches-for-snorkeling/

Afternoon sunlight makes the small kipuka at Alanui Kahiko glow, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan  New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Lava from Kilauea Volcano Flowing into the Sea, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Best Scenic Drives on Hawaii

An Unforgettable Scenic Drive through Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and Puna on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/18/an-unforgettable-scenic-drive-through-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-and-puna-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Kona Heritage Corridor Scenic Drive: An Exceptional Day Trip Exploration of Historical, Lovely, Up-Country Kona!:https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/14/kona-heritage-corridor-scenic-drive-an-exceptional-day-trip-exploration-of-historical-lovely-up-country-kona/

Best Scenic Drives on Hawaii #1: The Saddle Road…Kona to the Summit of Mauna Kea, Kaumana Cave and Hilo: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/best-scenic-drives-on-hawaii-1-the-saddle-road-kona-to-the-summit-of-mauna-kea-kaumana-cave-and-hilo-2/

Best Scenic Drives on Hawaii #2: North Kona and Kohala, Ancient History, Sumptuous Beaches: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/01/scenic-drive-2-north-kona-and-kohala-ancient-history-sumptuous-beaches/

Best Scenic Drives on Hawaii #3: Kona to Hamakua and Hilo: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/09/best-scenic-drives-on-hawaii-3-kona-to-hamakua-and-hilo-2/

Best Scenic Drives in Hawaii #4: Kona Coast to South Point and Ka’u: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/25/best-scenic-drives-in-hawaii-4-kona-coast-to-south-point-and-kau-2/

Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the ocean near Kalapana, Hawaii: Photograph by Donald B. MacGowan

Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the ocean near Kalapana, Hawaii: Photograph by Donald B. MacGowan

Best Scenic Drives in Hawaii #5: Kailua Kona to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Puna and Lava Viewing: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/27/best-scenic-drives-in-hawaii-5-kailua-kona-to-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-puna-and-lava-viewing-2/

Scenic Drive #6: Big Island Whirlwind Road Trip…I have to see the whole Big Island all in one day!https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/best-scenic-drives-in-hawaii-6-hawaii-whirlwind-road-trip-i-have-to-see-the-whole-big-island-all-in-one-day/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; The Most Interesting, Amazing and Diverse Scenic Drive in Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/a-scenic-drive-through-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-most-interesting-amazing-and-diverse-place-in-hawaii/

What Do I Do on the Big Island? Explore Hawaii’s Incomparable, Fantastic and Wild South Coast!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2008/12/20/what-do-i-do-on-the-big-island-explore-hawaiis-incomparable-fantastic-and-wild-south-coast/

Road Trip Through Keauhou Historic District, Big Island, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2008/07/10/wwwtourguidehawaicom-presents-a-road-trip-through-keauhou-historic-district-big-island-hawaii/

Explore Hawaii’s Hidden, Romantic and Mysterious Places: The South Coast of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/18/new-iphoneipod-touch-app-helps-you-explore-hawaiis-hidden-romantic-and-mysterious-places-the-south-coast-of-hawaii/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Papakolea: Green Sand (Mahana) Beach at South Point (Ka Lae), Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Best About Hiking:

The Best Short Hikes on Hawaii Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/29/the-best-short-hikes-on-hawaii-island/

The Adventure and Romance of Hiking To Kilauea Volcano’s Active Lava Flows: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2008/07/20/tour-guide-hawaii-presents-the-adventure-and-romance-of-hiking-to-kilauea-volcanos-active-lava-flows/

Near Kalapana, Hawaii, Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the ocean: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Near Kalapana, Hawaii, Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the ocean: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Exploring the Summit Hikes of Mauna Kea: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/23/exploring-the-summit-hikes-of-mauna-kea-hawaii/

South Point’s Justly Famous Green Sand Beach Hike, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/29/south-points-justly-famous-green-sand-beach-hike-papakolea-bay-and-mahana-beach-hawaii/

Hiking to Captain Cook Monument on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/hiking-to-captain-cook-monument-on-the-kona-coast-of-hawaii/

Hiking the Kilauea Iki Trail: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/24/hiking-the-kilauea-iki-trail-new-iphoneipod-touch-app-helps-you-find-all-the-unique-secluded-unusual-destinations-on-hawaii/

Hiking Hawaii’s Magnificent Waipi’o Valley: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/18/hiking-hawaiis-magnificent-waipio-valley/

Hike to Kamehameha’s Birthplace and the Forbidding Temple of Human Sacrifice, Mo’okini Heiau, on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/21/hike-to-kamehamehas-birthplace-and-the-forbidding-temple-of-human-sacrifice-mookini-heaiau-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Ka’u Desert’s Unearthly Hike to the Eerie Warrior Footprint Casts: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/05/2965/

Hiking Down Into Pololu Valley, Big Island, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/20/hiking-down-into-pololu-valley-big-island-of-hawaii/

Kiholo Bay Beach Hike: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/21/kiholo-bay-beach-hike/

Hiking to Honomalino Bay, Big Island, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/19/hiking-to-honomalino-bay-big-island-hawaii/

Historic Kailua Kona Town on the Big Island of Hawaii: A Walking Tour: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/03/historic-kailua-kona-town-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii-a-walking-tour/

Hiking and Camping at Hawaii’s Last Wilderness Beach: La’amaomao the Wind God and Makalawena Beach: Advice: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/02/21/hiking-and-camping-at-hawaiis-last-wilderness-beach-laamaomao-the-wind-god-and-makalawena-beach/

Driving and Hiking to the Summit of Mauna Kea, Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/07/26/advice-driving-and-hiking-to-the-summit-of-mauna-kea-big-island-of-hawaii/

Hidden Secrets of Hawaii: The Golden Ponds of Ke-awa-iki: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/21/hidden-secrets-of-hawaii-the-golden-ponds-of-ke-awa-iki/

Near Kalapana, Hawaii, Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the Ocean: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Near Kalapana, Hawaii, Lava from Kilauea Volcano flows into the Ocean: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Hiking at Kilauea Volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/01/07/hiking-at-kilauea-volcano-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Liz Fuller at Honaunau Bay, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B. MacGowan

Best About Snorkeling

The Best Snorkeling Spots on Hawaii Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/27/the-best-snorkeling-spots-on-hawaii-island/

Discovering Kona: Snorkeling at the Incomparable Two-Step Beach at Honaunau Bay: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/22/discovering-kona-snorkeling-at-the-incomparable-two-step-beach-at-honaunau-bay/

Exploring Kona: Discover hidden, beautiful, special Ho’okena Beach Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/24/exploring-kona-discover-hidden-beautiful-special-hookena-beach-park/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips, Part I: Gear: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/16/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-i-gear-2/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips, Part II: Technique : https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/18/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-ii-technique-2/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips, Part III: Protecting the Reef and Reef Animals: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/20/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-iii-reef-etiquette-2/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips, Part IV: Snorkeling Safety: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/26/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-iv-snorkeling-safety-2/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips, Part V: Best Snorkeling Beaches of the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/28/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-v-best-snorkeling-beaches-of-the-big-island-2/

Hawaii Island Snorkeling Tips Part VI: Wilderness Beaches of the Big Island!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/30/hawaii-island-snorkeling-tips-part-vi-wilderness-beaches-of-the-big-islanda/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Frank Burgess giving travel advice at Pu'u Honua O Honaunau National Historic Park, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #1: Introduction: Kona Coast: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/franks-big-island-travel-hints-1-north-kona-and-kohala-ancient-history-sumptuous-beaches/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #2: Kona South to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Hilo:https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/27/franks-big-island-travel-hints-2-kona-coast-south-of-honaunau-to-kau/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #3: Kona North to Waikoloa and the Kohala Coast:https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/29/1794/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #4: Waikoloa to Pololu Valley; https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/01/franks-big-island-travel-hints-4-waikoloa-to-pololu-valley-4/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #5: Hawi to Kona via the Kohala Mountain road, Waimea and Waikoloa: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/03/franks-big-island-travel-hints-5-hawi-to-kona-via-kohala-mountain-road-waimea-and-waikoloa-4/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #6: Waimea and the Hamakua Coast: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/04/franks-big-island-travel-hints-6-waimea-and-the-hamakua-coast-4/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints # 7: Around Hilo: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/06/franks-big-island-travel-hints-7-hilo-side-akaka-falls-to-panaewa-rainforest-zoo/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #8: Mysterious Puna!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/franks-big-island-travel-hints-8-mysterious-puna/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #9: Made for Adventure: The Jungles, Volcanoes, Hot Springs and Tidepools of Puna!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/09/franks-hawaii-travel-hints-9-made-for-adventure-the-jungles-volcanoes-hot-springs-and-tidepools-of-puna/

Kilauea Lava Flow Near Kalapana Hawaii, August 2010: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Kilauea Lava Flow Near Kalapana Hawaii, August 2010: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #10: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/11/franks-big-island-travel-hints-10-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park/

Frank’s Travel Hints # 11: Exploring Deeper Into Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Big Island, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/13/franks-big-island-travel-hints-11-exploring-deeper-into-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-big-island-hawaii/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #12: More fun in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Big Island, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/15/franks-big-island-travel-hints-12-more-fun-in-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-big-island-hawaii-4/

Frank’s Big Island Travel Hints #13: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Chain of Craters Road: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/17/franks-big-island-travel-hints-13-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-chain-of-craters-road/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

My Sister and Nieces Entering Thurston Lava Tube, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Best Exploration Information, Interesting Stories and General Reading about Hawaii

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Cliffs at Pololu Valley, North tip of Hawaii Island: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

-Kohala

Hawaii’s Most Famous Beach: Anaeho’omalu Bay on the Incomparable Kohala Coast: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/19/hawaiis-most-famous-beach-anaehoomalu-bay-on-the-incomparable-kohala-coast/

Exploring the Wild Kohala Coast: Hapuna Beach, the Crown Jewel of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/26/exploring-the-wild-kohala-coast-hapuna-beach-the-crown-jewel-of-hawaii/

Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Park: A Warrior becomes a King, an Island Archipelago Becomes a Kingdom: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/28/puukohola-heiau-national-historic-park-a-warrior-becomes-a-king-and-island-archepelago-becomes-a-kingdom/

Dreamy, laid back Hawi and Kapa’au: The Joy of North Kohala: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/28/dreamy-laid-back-hawi-and-kapaau-the-joy-of-north-kohala/

What’s Out There On The Western Tip of Hawaii Island? Kekaha Kai State Park!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/18/whats-out-there-on-thethe-western-tip-of-hawaii-island-kekaha-kai-state-park/

Delightful, beautiful Kua Bay on the Southern Kohala Coast, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/10/delightful-beautiful-kua-bay-on-the-southern-kohala-coast-hawaii/

Fabulous, secluded, amazing Waialea Beach (Beach 69) on the Kohala Coast of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/20/fabulous-secluded-amazing-waialea-beach-beach-69-on-the-kohala-coast-of-hawaii/

Exploring the Incredible Kohala Coast: Samuel Spencer Beach County Park and Mau’umae Beach: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/02/exploring-the-incredible-kohala-coast-samuel-spencer-beach-county-park-and-mauumae-beach/

Exploring the Wild Kohala Coastline: Lapakahi State Historical Park and Koai’e Cove, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/16/exporing-the-wild-kohala-coastline-lapakahi-state-historical-park-and-koai%E2%80%99e-cove-hawaii/

Exploring the Kohala Coast: Discover Maka O Hule Navigation Heiau: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/08/4017/

Discovering Kohala: Driving the Scenic and Fabulous Kohala Mountain Road: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/31/discovering-kohala-driving-the-scenic-and-fabulous-kohala-mountain-road/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Morning at Ahu'ena Heiau, Kailua Kona Hawaii Photo by Donnie MacGowan

-Kona

Historic Kailua Kona Town on the Big Island of Hawaii: A Walking Tour: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/03/historic-kailua-kona-town-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii-a-walking-tour/

Exploring Kona: Kahalu’u Beach, where people go to meet the fish!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/15/exploring-kona-kahaluu-beach-where-people-go-to-meet-the-fish/

Fabulous, Coastal Scenic Drive through Keauhou Historic District, North to South: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/23/fabulous-coastal-scenic-drive-through-keauhou-historic-district-north-to-south/

Discovering Kona: Snorkeling at the Incomparable Two-Step Beach at Honaunau Bay: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/22/discovering-kona-snorkeling-at-the-incomparable-two-step-beach-at-honaunau-bay/

Exploring Beautiful Kona, Hawaii: Magic Sands, La’aloa Beach Park and Haukalua Heiau: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/14/explorng-beautiful-kona-hawaii-magic-sands-laaloa-beach-park-and-haukalua-heiau/

Exploring Kona: Discover hidden, beautiful, special Ho’okena Beach Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/24/exploring-kona-discover-hidden-beautiful-special-hookena-beach-park/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Exploring Kealakekua Bay Archeological and Historical District, Captain Cook Monument and Hikiau Heiau, Perhaps the Most Important Historical Sites in Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/30/konas-fascinating-history-exploring-kealakekua-bay-archeological-and-historical-district-captain-cook-monument-and-hikiau-heiau-perhaps-the-most-important-historical-sites-in-hawaii/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Ahu’ena Heiau at Kamakahonu Beach: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/04/konas-fascinating-history-ahuena-heiau-at-kamakahonu-beach/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Pu’u Honua O Honaunau, The Place Of Refuge, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/24/konas-fascinating-history-puu-honua-o-honaunau-the-place-of-refuge/

Kona’s Fascinating History: The Ancient Temples and Villages, Fabulous Beaches and Scenic Hiking Trails of Koloko-Honokohau National Historic Park, Kona Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/02/3407/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Hulihe’e Palace: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/01/konas-fscinating-history-hulihee-palace/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Moku’aikaua Church–the First Christian Church in Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/02/konas-fscinating-history-mokuaikawa-the-first-christian-church-in-hawaii/

Kona’s Fascinating History: Kamakahonu Rock, the Kailua Pier and Seawall: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/konas-fascinating-history-kamakahonu-rock-the-kailua-pier-and-seawall/

Heartbreak of the Gods: Kuamo’o Battle Field and Lekeleke Graveyard: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/29/heartbreak-of-the-gods-kuamoo-batlle-field-and-lekeleke-graveyard-big-island-of-hawaii/

Rising From The Past: The Rebirth of Hapaiali’i Heiau, a Hawaiian Temple for Honoring Royalty: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/01/1118/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

The Green Sand Beach at South Point, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

-Ka’u

Exploring Hawaii’s South Point: Ka Lae And the Hike to the Green Sand Beach: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/05/exploring-hawaiis-south-point-ka-lae-and-the-hike-to-the-green-sand-beach/

Exploring Punalu’u Black Sand Beach in Ka’u Hawaii: Hiking, Snorkeling, Ancient Temples and Endangered Sea Turtles: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/22/exploring-punaluu-black-sand-beach-in-kau-hawaii-hiking-snorkeling-ancient-temples-and-endangered-sea-turtles/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Halema'uma'u Eruption in Kilauea Crater from the Jagger Museum, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

-Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The Beating Heart of the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-beating-heart-of-the-big-island/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The Most Interesting, Amazing and Diverse Scenic Drive in Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/a-scenic-drive-through-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-most-interesting-amazing-and-diverse-place-in-hawaii/

Kalapana Coastline and Kilauea lava flow, Hawaii August 2010: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Kalapana Coastline and Kilauea lava flow, Hawaii August 2010: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Incredible, wonderful, mysterious Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/05/28/incredible-wonderful-mysterious-kilauea-volcano-hawaii/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Along Crater Rim Drive: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/27/explorng-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-along-the-chain-of-craters-road/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Down the Chain of Craters Road: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/28/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-down-the-chain-of-craters-road/

Lava Flow from Kilauea Volcano, Kalapana, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Lava Flow from Kilauea Volcano, Kalapana, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Lava Viewing: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/29/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-lava-viewing/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Alanui Kahiko: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/20/chain-of-craters-road-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-alanui-kahiko/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Littoral explosion plume at Waikupanaha lava ocean entry, Puna Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Devastation Trail: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/06/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-devastation-trail/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Devil’s Throat Collapse Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/07/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-devils-throat-collapse-craterdevil%E2%80%99s-throat-less-than-110-of-a-mile-southwest-along-chain-of-craters-road-from-the-hilina-pali-road-turnoff-is-a-s/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: What’s at the End of Chain of Craters Road? Hiking! Mountain biking! Bird-watching!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/08/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-whats-at-the-end-of-chain-of-craters-road/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Hiking and Biking the Escape Road: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/09/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-hiking-and-biking-the-escape-road/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Halema’uma’u Crater Overlook: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/26/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-halemaumau-crater-overlook/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Halona Kahakai: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/09/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-halona-kahakai/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Hi’iaka Crater and the Lava Flow of 1973: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/10/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-hiiaka-crater-and-the-lava-flow-of-1973/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The incredible Hilina Pali Road: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/10/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-incredible-hilina-pali-road/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Sea arches, cliffs and wild ocean at the end of Chain of Craters Road, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Holei Lava Tube: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/11/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-holei-lava-tube/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Holei Pali: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/11/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-holei-pali/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Holei Sea Arch: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/11/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-holei-sea-arch/

Kalapana Coastline: Lava Flow from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Kalapana Coastline: Lava Flow from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Jagger Museum and Hawai’i Volcano Observatory: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/12/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-jagger-museum-and-hawai%E2%80%99i-volcano-observatory/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kealakomo Overlook: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/13/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kealakomo-overlook/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Keanakako’i Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/25/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-keanakakoi-crater/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kilauea Iki Overlook: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/13/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kilauea-iki-overlook/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kilauea Crater Overlook: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kilauea-crater-overlook/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kilauea Military Camp: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kilauea-military-camp/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kilauea Visitor’s Center: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/15/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kilauea-visitors-center/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kipuka Kahali’i: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/15/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kipuka-kahakihi/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Ko’oko’olau Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/15/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kookoolau-crater/

Appeasing the goddess at Halema'uma'u Crater, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Kulanaokuaiki Campground: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/16/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-kulanaokuaiki-campground/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Mauna Loa Lava Tree Molds: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/16/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-mauna-loa-lava-tree-molds/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Lua Manu Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/17/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-lua-manu-crater/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The Main Entrance: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/17/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-main-entrance/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Mau Loa O Mauna Ulu: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/18/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-mau-loa-of-mauna-ulu/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Along the Mauna Loa Scenic Road…Tree Molds, Kipuka Puaulu and Mauna Loa Summit Trailhead: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/18/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-along-the-mauna-loa-scenic-road%E2%80%A6tree-molds-kipuka-puaulu-and-mauna-loa-summit-trailhead/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Mauna Ulu, the Growing Mountain: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/19/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-mauna-ulu-the-growing-mountain/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Muliwai a Pele : https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/19/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-muliwai-a-pele/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Namakani Paio Campground: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-namakani-paio-campground/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Pauahi Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-nationa-park-pauahi-crater/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Pu’u Pua’i: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/21/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-puu-puai/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Puhimau Crater: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/21/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-puhimau-crater/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Pu’u Loa Petroglyph Field: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-puu-loa-petroglyph-field/

Visitors inspect petroglyphs at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The Southwest Rift Zone: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/25/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-southwest-rift-zone/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Sulfur Banks and Steaming Bluff: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-sulfur-banks-and-steaming-bluff/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National park: The Thurston Lava Tube: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-the-thurston-lava-tube/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: The Volcano Art Center: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/23/exporing-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-thurston-lava-tube/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Volcano House Hotel: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/24/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-volcano-house-hotel/

Picturesque Volcano Village: Food, gasoline and accommodations, just outside Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/24/picturesque-volcano-village-food-gasoline-and-accomodations-just-outside-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park/

Exploring Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Waldron Ledge Hike: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/03/25/exploring-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park-waldron-ledge-hike/

Visitors inspect petroglyphs at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Anthropomorphic petroglyph at Pu'u Loa, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

-Puna

Exploring Mysterious, Magnificent, Unspoiled Puna: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/02/exploring-mysterious-magnificent-unspoiled-puna/

Hawaii Lava Flow Update: August 2010 Viewing of Kilauea Lava Flows at Kaplapana on the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/hawaii-lava-flow-update-august-2010-viewing-of-kilauea-lava-flows-at-kaplapana-on-the-big-island/

Strange things seen at the lava flow, Kalapana, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Strange things seen at the lava flow, Kalapana, Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Kalapana, Hawaii: From the Fires of Hades to the Eden of Rebirth: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/01/17/kalapana-hawaii-from-the-fires-of-hades-to-the-eden-of-rebirth/

Exciting Puna: See flowing lava at Waikupanaha, Puna on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/16/hiking-at-the-waikupanaha-lava-ocean-entry-in-puna-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Discovering Puna: Exploring Lava Trees State Monument on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/19/dicovering-puna-exploring-lava-trees-state-monument-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Kupaianaha Vent on Kilauea Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Exploring Puna: Ahalanui Pond at Pu’ala’a County Park in Puna, Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/29/exploring-puna-ahalanui-pond-at-pu%E2%80%99ala%E2%80%99a-county-park-in-puna-hawaii/

Exploring Puna: Discover Charming, Eclectic, Surprising Pahoa Town!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/07/3982/

Discovering Puna: Explore Isaac Hale Beach Park at Pohoiki Bay, Puna Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/03/discovering-puna-explore-isaac-hale-beach-park-at-pohoiki-bay-puna-hawaii/

Exploring Puna: Discovering the Majestic, Primeval Tree Tunnels of Puna: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/01/exploring-puna-discovering-the-majestic-primeval-tree-tunnels-of-puna/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

From Mauna Kea to Mauna Loa, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

-Hilo, Waimea, Saddle Road and Hamakua

Unimaginably beautiful, surprisingly engaging and fantastically fun Hilo, Hawaii!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/06/unimaginably-beautfiul-surprisingly-engaging-and-fantastically-fun-hilo-hawaii/

My Favorite Scenic Drive: Hawaii’s Wild and Scenic Saddle Road!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/12/best-scenic-drives-on-hawaii-1-the-saddle-road-kona-to-the-summit-of-mauna-kea-kaumana-cave-and-hilo-2/

The Heart of Paniolo Country on the Big Island of Hawaii: Scenic, Historic Waimea: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/02/the-heart-of-paniolo-country-in-hawaii-scenic-historic-waimea/

Exploring the jungle trails of Akaka Falls on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/18/exploring-the-jungle-trails-of-akaka-falls-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Exploring Wailuku River Park and Rainbow Falls, Hilo Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/12/exloring-wailuku-river-park-and-rainbow-falls-hlio-hawaii/

Serene, lovely, enchanting Richardson Ocean Park, Hilo Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/08/serene-lovely-enchanting-richardson-ocean-park-hilo-hawaii/

Fabulous Hamakua: Discovering Honoka’a Town on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/01/fabulous-hamakua-discovering-honokaa-town-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

The Magic of Hilo District: Pe’epekeo Scenic Drive and Onomea Bay Trail: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/the-magic-of-hilo-district-peepekeo-scenic-drive-and-onomea-bay-trail/

Exploring Laupahoehoe Park, Hamakua Coast on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/21/exploring-laupahoehoe-park-hamakua-coast-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

Exploring Kaumana Cave, Just Outside Hilo Along the Saddle Road on the Big Island of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/20/exploring-kaumana-cave-just-outide-hilo-on-the-saddle-road-on-the-big-island-of-hawaii/

The Magic of Hilo District: Unforgettable, surprising, peaceful Kolekole Beach Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/01/29/the-magic-of-hilo-district-unforgetable-surprising-peaceful-kolekole-beach-park/

Exploring the Hamakua Coast, North of Hilo, Hawaii: Hakalau Canyon: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/12/27/exporng-the-hamakaua-coast-north-of-hilo-hawaii-hakalau-canyon/

Exploring Hawaii’s Saddle Road: Kipuka Pu’u Huluhulu Nature Trails and Kipuka Aina Hou Nene Sanctuary: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/02/11/5130/

Hilo Askance: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/10/10/hilo-askance/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Hikers at the beach in Waipi'o Valley, Hamakua Coast Hawaii: Photo by Donald B MacGowan

-Big Island General

The Call of Aloha…:https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/13/the-call-of-aloha/
The Beautiful, Enigmatic and Cryptic Petroglyphs of Hawaii Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/23/the-beautiful-enigmatic-and-cryptic-petroglyphs-of-hawaii-island/

Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles: Honu of the Big Island: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/09/19/hawaiis-magnificent-honu-the-endangered-hawaiian-green-sea-turtle/

A Quick Geologic History of the Hawai’ian Islands: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/05/16/a-quick-geologic-history-of-the-hawaiian-islands/

The Volcanoes of Hawaii Island: Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/05/17/the-volcanoes-of-hawaii-island-mahukona-kohala-mauna-kea-hualalai-mauna-lor/

A Brief History of Kona Coffee…: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/02/03/a-brief-history-of-kona-coffee/

A’a and Pahoehoe Lavas of Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2010/05/27/aa-and-pahoehoe-lavas-of-hawaii/

Hawaii’s Amazing Lava Fossils: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/08/24/hawaiis-amazing-lava-fossils/

The Sugar Industry in Hawaii: Kona Sugar Company and West Hawai’i Railway Company: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/25/the-sugar-industry-in-hawaii-kona-sugar-company-and-west-hawai%E2%80%99i-railway-company/

The Hawaiian Snow Goddess Poliahu and the Summit of Mauna Kea…: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/02/05/the-hawaiian-snow-goddess-poliahu-and-the-summit-of-mauna-kea/

Why I love Hawaii…: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/01/13/why-i-love-hawaii/

A Brief History of Ranching in Hawaii: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/05/24/rodeo-to-rock-and-roll-a-brief-history-of-ranching-in-hawaii/

Conjuring Visions of Paradise: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/02/19/conjuring-visions-of-paradise/

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Eric Carr braves high altitude and low temperatures to shoot video on the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

-Video

Kilauea’s Eruption Just Keeps Getting More Fantastic!: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2008/07/31/wwwtourguidehawaiicom-presents-new-video-of-kilauea-volcano-erupting/

Pu’u Loa Petroglyph Field, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/03/17/823/

Volcano Art Center—A Kipuka of Creativity on the Rim of Madam Pele’s Home: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/06/01/volcano-art-center-hawaii-volcanoes-national-park/

Jagger Museum, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/01/jagger-museum-hawaii-volcanoes-national-rark/

Captain Cook’s Legacy: Exploring the History and Waters of Kealakekua Bay: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/04/07/949/

Mo’okini Heiau: Warrior Kings and Human Sacrifice on Hawai’i: https://lovingthebigisland.wordpress.com/2009/01/03/mookini-heiau-warrior-kings-and-human-sacrifice-on-hawaii-2/

 

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Bart Hunt Snorkeling at Kahalu'u Beach, Kona Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

To see the new iPhone/iPod Touch App, please visit http://www.tourguidehawaii.com/iphone.html. The best of Tour Guide Hawaii’s free content about traveling to, and exploring, the Big island, can be found here.

 

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

King Kamehameha Statue, Wailoa Park, Hilo Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donnie MacGowan

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and on touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

For independent reviews of our product, written by some of our legions of satisfied customers, please check this out.

All media copyright 2009 by Donald B. MacGowan. All rights reserved.

New at iTunes: Hawaii Dream Vacation iPhone/iPod Touch App Puts the Magic of Hawaii in the Palm of Your Hand. Interactive maps, GPS and WiFi enabled, dozens of videos…available at iTunes or www.tourguidehawaii.com.

Captain James Cook Monument from Manini Beach on Kealakekua Bay, Kona Hawaii: Graphic from Photo by Donald B MacGowan

Reprinted from here.

New Webcam menu makes lava views safely available

Lava in Kîlauea's summit vent creates a nighttime glow that can be safely observed from the Jaggar Museum overlook in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park or on the HVO Webcam.  Inset image shows the lava surface, which was moving from top center to lower left at the time it was taken.
Lava in Kīlauea’s summit vent creates a nighttime glow that can be safely observed from the Jaggar Museum overlook in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park or on the HVO Webcam. Inset image shows the lava surface, which was moving from top center to lower left at the time it was taken.

The HVO Web site was recently revamped to make access to our increasing number of Webcams easier for viewers and the HVO staff who post Webcam images. All HVO Webcams are now linked through a single menu at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/.

The menu lists our five Webcams showing Moku`aweoweo, Mauna Loa summit caldera, the TEB vent and lava tube system on Kīlauea’s east rift zone, Pu`u `Ō `ō crater, and two views of the Halema`uma`u vent—one from HVO and another from the rim of Halema`uma`u crater immediately above the new vent.

Webcams allow us to make critical measurements with relatively little risk. The Webcams can work in rain, wind, very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide, and even moderate amounts of ash blasted from the vent. They can be in areas where access is restricted for safety reasons. Webcams can be where people should not.

Two of our Webcams have shown active lava in recent days. On Tuesday night, the TEB Webcam caught active flows near the top of the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. As an added treat, the Webcam also caught lights from a cruise ship passing the Kalapana shoreline in the late evening getting good views of the active flows and the Waikupanaha ocean entry.

The Webcams that chronicle developments below the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater have recorded lots of glow since early May. In fact, the recent glow has been the brightest since October 2008. The brightness of the glow is due to molten lava circulating in a narrow conduit about 100 m below the crater floor and about 180 m below the crater rim.

The Webcam located on the rim of Halema`uma`u was recently repositioned to look directly into the vent for views of the circulating lava when clear enough. The wispiness of the gas plume and the relative shallowness of the molten lava have allowed some good views recently. The vent is masked by sunlit fume during the day and is overexposed at night so the best times to look at Webcam views of lava are at dusk and dawn.

The unwavering Webcam views will allow us to better monitor the rise and fall of the lava within the vent. HVO geologists have also recorded video of the lava surface that shows some fascinating movements (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/kilauea/update/images.html). The lava emerges from the right side of the Webcam view and flows left across the opening. The flowing lava surface looks chaotic with lots of splashing and bursting bubbles—activity that produces the tephra that is carried aloft by the hot, rising gas and deposited on the rim.

Two recent Volcano Watches have discussed reasons for lava circulation using a lava lamp analogy. Magma must be convecting with the conduit, like the “goo” in a lava lamp, bringing hot, bubble-rich lava to the surface while allowing cooler, bubble-poor lava to sink.

Looking at lava within the Halema`uma`u vent conduit is like watching a lava lamp from above through a hole in the top, all the goo colored orange, and blobs being gas bubbles that burst when they get to the top.

Views from the Halema`uma`u Webcam should allow us to test our ideas about what precedes brown plumes and explosive eruptions. Do rocks fall from vent walls into the molten circulating lava trigger a vigorous gas release which could carry even more spatter and rock dust out of the vent. Or are the brown plumes and more energetic explosive eruptions initiated by a big slug of gas coming up the conduit.

For safety reasons, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park restricts access to the entire caldera including Crater Rim Drive from Jaggar Museum south to the Chain of Craters Road intersection. Thanks to the HVO Webcams, we can all see what’s happening from much safer vantage points.

Kīlauea Activity Update

A deflation/inflation (DI) event at the summit of Kīlauea last weekend disrupted the supply of lava through the tube system and caused the Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u ocean entries to shut down. Both entries had resumed by mid-week, accompanied by breakouts near the top of Royal Gardens subdivision and just inland from Kupapa`u.

At Kīlauea’s summit, the vent within Halema`uma`u Crater continues to emit elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas, resulting in high concentrations of sulfur dioxide downwind. Vigorously upwelling lava within the vent below the crater floor produced bright glow at night, loud gas-rushing noises, and the emission of juvenile ash during the past week.

One earthquake beneath Hawai`i Island was reported felt this past week. A magnitude-3.4 earthquake occurred at 3:55 p.m., H.s.t, on Saturday, May 30, 2009, and was located 9 km (6 miles) southwest of Kīlauea Summit at a depth of 26 km (16 miles).

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for detailed Kīlauea and Mauna Loa activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea activity summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov. Volcano Watch is a weekly article and activity update written by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and touring the volcanoes of the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

How do recent earthquakes fit into the Kilauea puzzle?

Hawaii earthquakes: USGS Illustration, reprinted from http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/2009/09_04_23.html.

Hawaii earthquakes: USGS Illustration, reprinted from http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/2009/09_04_23.html.

During the past two weeks, two noteworthy earthquakes struck Kīlauea Volcano’s south flank. While the south flank is among the most seismically active areas in the U. S., the vast majority of earthquakes beneath it are too small to be of general interest. At the same time, each earthquake beneath the volcano represents a piece of a very complex puzzle that we continually watch and study.

The earthquakes on April 14 (magnitude 5.0) and April 21 (magnitude 4.2) occurred at depths of roughly 9 km (5.5 miles) below the Earth’s surface in regions adjacent to Kīlauea’s east rift zone. These earthquakes gently punctuated the steady, southeastward motions of Kīlauea’s south flank. They are noteworthy because they were widely felt across Hawai`i Island (see http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/).

Parts of the active fault system responsible for the earthquakes are visible as the spectacular scarps that line Hawai`i’s southeast coast within Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. A major part of the system—a fault representing the decollement, or detachment surface, between the ancient oceanic crust and the volcanic “pile” built up from repeated volcanic eruption and intrusion—becomes most apparent in larger earthquakes, as on April 14 or two of Hawai`i’s larger earthquakes in 1989 (magnitude 6.1) and 1975 (magnitude 7.2).

With capabilities afforded by continuous GPS monitoring, we measure considerable movement of Kīlauea’s south flank that occurs as steady or stable motion. Large in a geophysical context, the movements occur at rates of several inches (centimeters) per year. At a conceptual level, it is reasonable to view the decollement as a through-going and somewhat uniform fault beneath the flank.

The south flank fault system is more complex, however, when seen from the perspective of earthquake distributions. There are some regions of the south flank that are surprisingly devoid of earthquake activity. Looking back through the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s record of seismicity, patterns of south flank earthquake hypocenters, or computed locations, also display a general level of clustering.

While they are all related to the decollement, April 2009’s two earthquakes and the 1989 and 1975 earthquakes each occurred in distinctly separate south flank clusters. The magnitude-5.0 earthquake on April 14 occurred in one of the south flank’s western earthquake clusters. The magnitude-4.2 earthquake on April 21 occurred about 10 km (6 miles) to the east of that cluster. The 1989 earthquake was located a few kilometers (miles) east of the April 21 hypocenter, and the 1975 earthquake was about 8 km (5 miles) east of the 1989 hypocenter.

Interestingly, between the two clusters containing the April 2009 earthquakes lies a section of the south flank decollement system that has produced thousands of small earthquakes, but not a single magnitude 4 or larger earthquake since 1970. In comparison, during that same time interval, the April 14 magnitude-5.0 cluster has produced 30 such earthquakes, and the April 21 magnitude-4.2 cluster has produced 45 such earthquakes.

The earthquake clustering reflects variation in fault properties and fault structure along the decollement. Variation of earthquake behaviors within and among different clusters reflects additional complexity associated with movement of the south flank. In addition to understanding the fault properties and structures, we are striving to learn more about the forces resulting from magma residing in the rift zones and the frictional resistance along the active faults.

Each new south flank earthquake, especially if large enough to be felt, reprises questions of Kīlauea’s next possible magnitude-7 south flank earthquake. While we lack clear-cut answers to some of those questions, each earthquake compels us to look more closely and provides new information to fit into the Kīlauea puzzle.

Activity update

The Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u ocean entries remain active, with small littoral explosions common at the Kupapa`u entry over the past week. Surface flows inland from Kupapa`u remain active along the eastern boundary of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.

At Kīlauea’s summit, the vent within Halema`uma`u Crater continues to emit elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas, resulting in high concentrations of sulfur dioxide downwind. Variable glow and vent noises over the past week suggest that lava is still present at shallow levels below the floor of Halema`uma`u crater.

A magnitude-4.2 earthquake at 4:58 p.m. H.s.t. on Tuesday, April 21, was located beneath Kīlauea’s south flank, about 44 km (27 miles) south of Hilo and at a depth of 9.2 km (5.7 miles). The earthquake caused no significant changes to Kīlauea’s ongoing eruptions. More than 200 people reported feeling it (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/events/hv/00033612/us/index.html).

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch/2009/09_04_23.html) for detailed Kīlauea and Mauna Loa activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and touring the Big Island in particular, please also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

Steam Erupting from Halema’uma’u Crater on Kilauea: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Unless you’ve been sitting in a lava cave (the way we sometimes do) you should be well aware that this Sunday is the beginning of the annual Merrie Monarch festival—the world’s premier event for watching and learning about the Hawaiian hula.

The hula kahiko, or ancient hula form, is always the crowd favorite on Friday night. The kahiko is one expression of the mo`olelo, or stories, of Hawaiian culture. Of course, a popular theme of hula performed during the Merrie Monarch involves stories of Pele, the Hawaiian deity of the volcano.

The hula of Pele uses rhythmic rising, falling, swaying, and flowing, accompanied by the oli, or chant, and beats of instruments to portray the likeness and action of Pele and the volcano as one inseparable entity. So it may be of little surprise to you that the rhythmic nature of the hula and chants describing the volcano would accurately portray of the bursting forth, and diminishing of such things like lava flows and explosions. But have you ever wondered if the rhythms of the hula have any relation to detailed scientific observations made at the volcano? The answer may be surprising to you; the connections go deeper than you think, and certainly deeper than we’re aware of.

Much of the behavior of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes are rhythmic in nature. The sounds, earthquakes, and ground swelling of these volcanoes, have all been found to follow rhythmic patterns.

Perhaps the most obvious rhythm of the volcano is the very sound the volcano makes. Anyone who has had the privilege of being near a lava vent can attest to the rhythmic sounds of gas and lava gushing from vents. This is the `uhi `uha sound in the hula chants that results from gases and gas-charged magma rushing through vents, or conduits, in the volcano. Much like a pahu drum, the size of the chamber controls the depth of the sound. These sounds actually extend well beyond the range of human hearing into a realm called the “infrasound”. Geologists record and study the depth and breadth of these infrasonic beats to model the internal structure vents and conduits.

The shaking of the volcano also occurs with rhythmic frequency. In the current episode of eruptive activity at Kīlauea, something called episodic tremor has been frequently observed. Episodic tremor is a pattern of seismic activity, or shaking of the volcano, that occurs at semi-regular intervals. Patterns of seismic activity like this have been seen at Mount St. Helens where they were called “drum beat” seismicity. Episodic tremor at Kīlauea can be seen on seismic recorders as triangular-shaped bursts periodically placed—an imprinting reminiscent of a kapa-cloth pattern. A current interpretation is that episodic tremor is caused by the repeated rising and falling of the lava surface underground.

In addition to shaking, the volcano’s entire body also sways, or deforms, in rhythmic ways. The ground surface of Kīlauea regularly rises and falls in cycles called deflation-inflation (DI) events. These events are linked to pulses of magma and gas which rise regularly under the summit of Kīlauea in the region of Halema`uma`u. An interesting consequence of magma migration is a coordinated dance of the ground surface at the summit and east rift zone of Kīlauea. As a pulse of magma rises up under Halema`uma`u, the summit of Kīlauea expands, rising upward. As this magma makes its way down the east rift the ground beneath Pu`u `Ō `ō begins to rise too. The dancers complete their turn over the course of a day or so.

The above descriptions only scratch the surface of many deeper rhythmic relationships that exist. So as you watch and hear the hula of Merrie Monarch this year, we encourage you enjoy the mo`olelo `o Pele and hula—both its sheer beauty and, also, its remarkable accuracy in describing the essence of volcanoes.

Activity update

The Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u ocean entries remain active. Surface flows inland from Kupapa`u, which began late last week following a deflation-inflation (DI) event at Kīlauea’s summit, remain active along the eastern boundary of the National Park.

At Kīlauea’s summit, the vent within Halema`uma`u Crater continues to emit elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas, resulting in high concentrations of sulfur dioxide downwind. Though not directly observed, vent noises suggest that lava is still present within the vent about 100 m (110 yds) below the floor of Halema`uma`u crater.

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for detailed Kīlauea and Mauna Loa activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov. skip past bottom navigational bar

To see Tour Guide Hawaii video of Kilaeua eruptions go here and here.

For moreinformation on visiting Hawaii in general and touring the Hawaiin volcnoes in particular, plese also visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

This post has been greatly expanded, updated and modified—a very much superior version resides here; I think you will prefer it!

Photos and Text by Donald MacGowan

The Men of Tour Guide decided to take some much needed time away from the office and take a scenic drive to the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island.

The Men of Tour Guide on the Road: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Men of Tour Guide on the Road: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

We left Kailua Kona in the early morning and drove Highway 190 towards Waimea Town.

 Along Highway 190 Looking Toward Kohala Mountain: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Along Highway 190 Looking Toward Kohala Mountain: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

We past by the spectacular over looks of the Kohala Coastline and on up the hills towards Pu’uanahulu.

Hualalai Volcano and Pu'uananhulu from Hwy-190--Note Yellow Blossoms on Silver Oaks: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Hualalai Volcano and Pu'uananhulu from Hwy-190--Note Yellow Blossoms on Silver Oaks: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

When we reached Waimea, snow covered Mauna Kea was standing tall in the morning sun to greet us.

Snow on Mauna Kea Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Snow on Mauna Kea Waimea, Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Statue of Heroic Paniolo Ikua Purdy, Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Statue of Heroic Paniolo Ikua Purdy, Waimea Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Dropping down to the Hamakua Coast from Waimea on Highway 19, we past through the fragrant and beautiful eucalyptus forest, with more views of Mauna Kea.

Driving through the Eucalyptus Forest on Highhway 19 Between Honoka'a and Waimea: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Driving through the Eucalyptus Forest on Highhway 19 Between Honoka'a and Waimea: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Snow on Mauna Kea from Hwy 19: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Snow on Mauna Kea from Hwy 19: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

We paused in Honoka’a Town for a much needed cup of coffee and to take a moment to stroll the enchanting shops along the main street of town.

Honoka'a Town is Lined With Intersting and Wonderful Shops and Restaurants--Including Some of Hawaii's Best Antique Stores: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Honoka'a Town is Lined With Intersting and Wonderful Shops and Restaurants--Including Some of Hawaii's Best Antique Stores: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Like a Miniature Triceratops, This Jackson's Chameleon Unconcernedly Strolls the Streets of Honaka'a: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Like a Miniature Triceratops, This Jackson's Chameleon Unconcernedly Strolls the Streets of Honaka'a: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Driving north, we headed toward Waipi’o Valley with the idea of hiking down to the beach.

Waipi'o Valley, Hamakua Coast, Big Island of Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Waipi'o Valley, Hamakua Coast, Big Island of Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Loading up the cameras and gear, Frank and I headed down, while Everett explored around the top of the canyon.

Waipi'o Valley Day Hikers: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Waipi'o Valley Day Hikers: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Reaching the floor of the canyon, we explored the beach, the mouth of the river and the waterfalls–Waipi’o is a place of magic, myth and great beauty–it was absolutely lovely to have an unhurried morning to poke around and explore.

Mouth of Waipi'o Stream: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Mouth of Waipi'o Stream: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Waipi'o Stream from the Mouth of Waipi'o Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Waipi'o Stream from the Mouth of Waipi'o Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

After shooting as many pictures as our batteries could stand, we climbed up out of the canyon..it’s only a mile and less than a thousand feet, but it’s a hike that’ll get your full attention! And it’s gorgeous and awe-inspiring the whole way back up…out of breath? Stop and enjoy the view!

The Road in Waipi'o Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

The Road in Waipi'o Valley: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

View Down into Waipio Valley Floor: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

View Down into Waipi'o Valley Floor: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Catching our breath and having a bite of lunch, we continued our Soiree down the Hamakua Coast, next stop–Laupahoehoe Park and Tsunami Memorial.

Overview of Laupahoehoe Park, Hamakua Coast, Big Island: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Overview of Laupahoehoe Park, Hamakua Coast, Big Island: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Explosive Wavespray at Laupahoehoe Park, Hamakua Coast, Big Island of Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Explosive Wavespray at Laupahoehoe Park, Hamakua Coast, Big Island of Hawaii: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Next, we took a small restroom break at Kolekole Park and wound up exploring the river and canyon there.

Kolekole Stream Near Kolekole Beach: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Kolekole Stream Near Kolekole Beach: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Kolekole Stream leaps heroically off Akaka Falls and flows through one of the most amazing jungle Canyons on the Island of Hawaii.

Kolekole Canyon Road: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Kolekole Canyon Road: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Since we’d seen Kolekole Stream flowing into the sea, we decided to drive through the town of Honomu (fabulous ice cream!) and visit Akaka Falls to see how the park renovations were coming along.

Akaka Falls: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Akaka Falls: Photo by Donnie MacGowan

Numerous Small Waterfalls Dot the Fern Grottos Around Akaka Falls: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Numerous Small Waterfalls Dot the Fern Grottos Around Akaka Falls: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Finally, we decided to drive the Pe’epekeo Scenic Drive–an old and very scenic section of the Mamalahoa Highway–before heading home to Kailua Town.

Along the Pepe'ekeo Scenic Drive: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Along the Pepe'ekeo Scenic Drive: Photo by Donald MacGowan

At this point, we decided to hustle home–we just had time to get back to Kailua Town and catch the Taco’s el Pastor special at Habeneros!

Sunset over the Ancient Surfing Temple of Ku'emanu Heiau, Kona Hawaii: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Sunset over the Ancient Surfing Temple of Ku

For more information on exploring Hawaii in general and scenic drives on the Big Island in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

Halema`uma`u March 24

Halema`uma`u March 24

A plume of volcanic gas and ash rises from a vent on the east side of Halema`uma`u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea caldera. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Jaggar Museum of Volcanology are in the foreground.

After one year, Kīlauea’s summit eruption is still going strong

(To see a recent video of Halema’uma’u eruption, go here)

It seems like only yesterday when the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitored a several-week build-up in seismic tremor levels and sulfur dioxide emissions in early 2008. While some staff members speculated that a small summit eruption might be on the way, others were convinced, from the lack of earthquake activity and deformation, that Pele was just restless, and that a summit eruption was unlikely.

Then, on March 12, 2008, an area of gas emission formed on the east wall of Halema`uma`u Crater, within Kīlauea’s caldera. The extreme temperature of the gases caused the vent to glow at night, attracting tourists and locals alike to the viewpoint at the Jaggar Museum of Volcanology. Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park closed the south part of the caldera to visitors in response to the increased concentrations of hazardous gases—a closure which remains in effect today.

The real surprise occurred at 2:58 a.m. on March 19, 2008, when a small explosion occurred from the site of the gas emission. The explosion—the first at Kīlauea’s summit since 1924-threw rocks and boulders over about 40 hectares (100 acres), destroying the Halema`uma`u tourist overlook, blanketing the Halema`uma`u parking lot with rocks and ash, and marking the start of the summit eruption that continues to this day.

Since that event almost one year ago, thousands of tonnes of sulfur dioxide and other volcanic gases have issued from the March 19 explosion crater. The gas has had a tremendous impact on the residents of Hawai`i Island, damaging crops on the south part of the island and worsening existing health problems for people from Hilo to Kona.

Despite the widespread effects of the gas emissions, very little lava has erupted from the vent. A small amount of ash is produced every day, but the bulk of the lava that erupted has been the result of occasional explosions that occurred throughout 2008 (none have occurred in 2009-yet). Near-daily ash collection and mapping of explosive deposits reveal that the total amount of lava and ash erupted is too small to even fill your local supermarket! In fact, the amount of lava and ash produced by the summit eruption is equivalent to what is erupted from Kīlauea’s east rift zone in just five hours.

Even though only a small amount has actually erupted, lava has been seen within the vent. Visual observations identified a lava lake about 300 feet below the vent rim in September and October 2008. In February 2009, images from an infrared camera, which is able to see through much of the gas plume, saw a lava lake at a greater depth, about 450 feet below the rim. This lake has recently been replaced by a series of small, spattering vents, still well below the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater.

The current summit eruption has already surpassed the length of all previous summit eruptions at Kīlauea since 1924. In December 2008, HVO scientists thought that the eruption actually might be coming to a close, since activity diminished markedly. Instead of dense, white, roiling, emissions, the plume was wispy, thin, and lazy. Glow disappeared from the vent, and seismic tremor levels dropped considerably.

Of course, Pele was just being her usual, devious self. In January, the return of weak glow and a strong, white plume signaled the renewal of the summit eruption. One year in, there are no signs that the eruption will be ending anytime soon.

The past year has been one of surprises, to say the least. The type of activity currently on display at Kīlauea’s summit is unprecedented in the nearly 200 years of recorded eruptions. HVO will continue to closely monitor the eruption to improve our knowledge of how Kīlauea works and to watch for signs of clearing air that might signify the end of this chapter of Kīlauea’s history.

Activity update

The Waikupanaha ocean entry remains active, and a small collapse early Wednesday morning (3/11) removed part of the delta there. West of the ocean entry, lava flows were active on the coastal plain and had reached to within 180 m (200 yds) of the ocean near Kupapa`u by mid-morning on Wednesday.

At Kīlauea’s summit, the vent within Halema`uma`u Crater continues to emit elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas, resulting in high concentrations of sulfur dioxide downwind. Lava remains just out of sight more than 90 m (100 yds) below the vent rim.

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for detailed Kīlauea and Mauna Loa activity updates, recent volcano photos, recent earthquakes, and more; call (808) 967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary; email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov. skip past bottom navigational bar

For more information on traveling to Hawai in general and seeing the volcanoes of the Big Island in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

Why all the fuss about Mauna Loa this month?

 The Mauna Loa 1984 summit eruption.
The Mauna Loa 1984 summit eruption (USGS Photo).

As noted in Volcano Watch a few weeks ago, this month marks the 25th anniversary of Mauna Loa’s most recent eruption—a 22-day event that began on March 25, 1984. The article also mentioned a series of public programs that will be conducted in recognition of this anniversary.

Mauna Loa has been quiet for a quarter of a century, and considering the current lack of shallow seismicity that typically precedes volcanic activity by months or years, it is not expected to erupt any time soon. So, why all the fuss about this volcano?

A look at Mauna Loa’s eruption frequency over the past 2,000 years shows that it has erupted, on average, once every 10 years. The volcano’s short-term average is even more remarkable. Between 1843 and 1950, Mauna Loa erupted every 4 to 7 years. Based on this eruption history, you could easily conclude that the volcano is overdue for its next eruption.

During the 166 years that Mauna Loa’s activity has been documented in writing, there’s only one other time when the volcano remained quiet for 25 years—the period between its June 1, 1950, and July 5, 1975, eruptions. Mauna Loa’s repose since 1984 will soon match that record.

A third of Hawai`i Island’s current population was not yet born in 1984. There’s also been an influx of malihini (newcomers) who moved to the island after Mauna Loa erupted. Given these two facts, a significant number of island residents may not be aware that Mauna Loa is an active volcano.

Even people who witnessed the 1984 eruption may not know—or remember—the full potential of volcanic hazards posed by Mauna Loa. A lot can be forgotten in 25 years.

The silver anniversary of Mauna Loa’s last eruption affords an ideal occasion to remind us all of these concerns. Thus, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is planning a series of public programs about past, present, and future activity on the world’s largest volcano.

Two talks will be presented as After Dark in the Park programs in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. On Tuesday, March 17, HVO geologist Frank Trusdell, who has been mapping and studying Mauna Loa for nearly two decades, will speak about the volcano’s eruptive history and current status. On Tuesday, March 24, Jack Lockwood, a former HVO volcanologist, will describe events leading up to, and during, Mauna Loa’s 1984 eruption.

Both talks will be in the Kilauea Visitor Center auditorium, starting at 7:00 p.m. For more information, call (808) 985-6011 or go to the Park Web site (http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/events_adip.htm).

HVO will also provide outreach programs in three communities around the island in collaboration with the University of Hawai`i at Hilo’s Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, Hawai`i County Civil Defense, and Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.

These community programs will begin with a brief introductory presentation, followed by an informal “talk story” session, during which you can meet and interact with scientists, public safety officials, and park rangers. The programs are designed so that you can come and go at your leisure to talk story, but to hear the introductory presentation, you should arrive at the starting time.

Two programs are scheduled for Saturday, March 28—from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. at UH-Hilo in UCB 100/127, and from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. at St. Jude’s Church in Ocean View. On Saturday, April 4, a program will be held at the Konawaena Elementary School cafeteria in Kealakekua from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Displays set up for the talk story session will address frequently asked questions about Mauna Loa—such as, “Will it erupt soon?”—but you are welcome to bring any and all questions that you’d like to ask about the volcano. Children can engage in activities and demonstrations set up just for them.

Mauna Loa will erupt again—and chances are good that it will happen during your lifetime-so you are encouraged to attend one of the community programs. There’s no better time than now to educate yourself about the massive volcano in your backyard.

Activity update

Kīlauea Volcano continues to be active. A vent in Halema`uma`u Crater is emitting elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas and producing small amounts of ash. Resulting high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in downwind air have closed the south part of Kīlauea caldera and produced occasional air quality alerts in more distant areas, such as Pahala and communities adjacent to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, during kona wind periods. Using a thermal camera, a small, puffing cone, varying in shape and size over the past week, has been visible about 100 yards below the vent rim.

Pu`u `Ō`ō also continues to produce significant amounts of sulfur dioxide. Trade winds tend to pool these emissions along the West Hawai`i coast, while Kona winds blow these emissions into communities to the north, such as Mountain View, Volcano, and Hilo.

A deflation/inflation (DI) event at Kilauea’s summit early in the week caused no reported disruption in the supply of lava erupting from the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout (TEB) vent at the eastern base of Pu`u `O`o. Lava continues to enter the ocean at Waikupanaha and is rebuilding the delta there, which collapsed last Saturday (February 28). Thursday (March 5) marked the one-year anniversary of the start of the Waikupanaha ocean entry. Lava was also active on the coastal plain a few hundred yards from the ocean near Waha’ula in the National Park.

Be aware that active and recently inactive lava deltas can collapse at any time, potentially generating large explosions. This may be especially true during times of rapidly changing lava supply conditions. The Waikupanaha delta has collapsed several times in the past year, with at least four of the collapses resulting in rock blasts. These blasts have tossed television-sized rocks up onto the sea-cliff and have thrown fist-sized rocks more than 275 yards inland. It is unclear whether the February 28 collapse was accompanied by an explosion.

Do not approach the ocean entry or venture onto lava deltas. Even the intervening beaches are susceptible to large waves generated during delta collapse; avoid these beaches. In addition, steam plumes rising from ocean entries are highly acidic and laced with glass particles. Call Hawai`i County Civil Defense at 961-8093 for viewing hours.

Mauna Loa is not erupting. Three earthquakes were located beneath the summit this past week. Continuing extension between locations spanning the summit indicates slow inflation of the volcano, combined with slow eastward slippage of its east flank.

Four earthquakes beneath Hawai`i Island were reported felt within the past week. A magnitude-2.2 earthquake occurred at 12:06 p.m., H.s.t, on Thursday, February 26, 2009, and was located 12 km (8 miles) north of Kailua at a depth of 36 km (22 miles). A magnitude-2.2 earthquake occurred at 4:59 p.m. on Saturday, February 28, and was located 9 km (6 miles) west of Kailua at a depth of 11 km (7 miles). A magnitude-3.0 earthquake occurred at 9:20 a.m. on Wednesday, March 4, and was located 26 km (16 miles) southwest of Kailua at a depth of 38 km (24 miles). A magnitude-2.9 earthquake occurred at 8:25 a.m. on Thursday, March 5, and was located 3 km (2 miles) northeast of Pu`ulena Crater at very shallow depth.

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for daily Kīlauea eruption updates, a summary of volcanic events over the past year, and nearly real-time Hawai`i earthquake information. Kīlauea daily update summaries are also available by phone at (808) 967-8862. Questions can be emailed to askHVO@usgs.gov. skip past bottom navigational bar

For more information on touring Hawaii in general and seeing the volcanoes of the Big Island in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

For a third day of driving, it’s time to explore the east side of the Big Island. Hilo is known to be one of the wettest cities in the U.S and tropical rainforest extends from the Puna district, south of Hilo, all the way to the northern tip of the island. Here, Tour Guide will show you the favorite sights and the out-of-the-way places as well.

Super tip: For this leg of your tour you should bring some rain gear. Umbrellas or panchos are the easiest ways to get a little protection. It tends to rain off and on throughout to day on the east side.

Leaving Kona, take Hwy 190 up the mountain for some panoramic views of the Kohala Coast. It’s about a 45 minute drive to Waimea, which is a good place to stop for breakfast or at the grocery store if you haven’t stocked your cooler already. Tour Guide will have all the info on museums, an arboretum as well as shopping and up-country activities in Waimea. Here you’ll also connect to Hwy 19.

Continue on Hwy 19 north and view the scenic rolling pasturelands of the Parker Ranch, one of the largest privately owned ranches in the U.S. About 20 minutes drive brings you to the town of Honoka’a. Turning left, and going through town, you’ll find more great shops, antique stores and restaurants. Nine miles on Hwy 240 brings you to Waipi’o Valley. This is one of the most photographed areas in the state. This 20 mile stretch between Waipi’o and Pololu is often called “Hawaii untouched”, boasting the largest waterfalls in the state, but can only be viewed by air tours or multi-day hikes. Tour Guide will tell you why this area was sacred to the ancient Hawaiians. You can also find out about air tours in Tour Guide’s activities section.

Head back toward Honoka’a Hwy 19 and turn southbound toward Hilo along the Hamakua Coast. This area was once all sugar cane fields but now many diversified agricultural crops are grown here. The first crop you will see is eucalyptus. Acres and acres of this fragrant tree yield sap for medicines and perfumeries all around the world. There is a rainforest preserve, Kalopa Park, just 3 miles upslope from the hwy. It’s tricky to find, but Tour Guide will show you the way to this peaceful cabin camp spot with horseback riding and bird watching.

As you continue driving south, you cross many bridges over gorges and valleys, many of which have viewable waterfalls and rivers that empty into the ocean. Don’t forget to stop and get some pictures this unique scenery. The terrain is lush and green with a huge variety of tropical flowers. Other crops also come into view such as mangoes, papayas, ginger and bananas. Tour Guide will tell you about the trains that used to transport sugar cane to the mills near Hilo and you can stop and see the train museum along the way.

Next up is one of the most famous and beautiful waterfalls in Hawaii, Akaka Falls, a 420 ft. fall, which is just 3 miles off the hwy, but worlds away. The one mile hike on a paved trail through the rainforest will pass two smaller waterfalls as well as orchid, heleconia, plumeria and other tropical plants. Tour Guide will tell the history of this area as well.

For more information about touring Hawaii in general and the Big Island in particular, visit tourguidehawaii.com and tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

The Eruption of Halema'uma'u as seen from Steaming Bluff, HVNP, August, 2008: Photo by Donald MacGowan

The Eruption of Halema'uma'u as seen from Steaming Bluff, HVNP, August, 2008: Photo by Donald MacGowan

Quiescence in 1913 is similar to 2008 events

In most sciences, processes are investigated by identifying the factors that affect them and varying each factor, in turn, to determine its contribution. In field geology, this is difficult; instead, we compare and contrast events or locations to learn more about the processes. At Kīlauea, there is a long, well-documented history with which to compare and contrast current activities. Summit events at Kīlauea over the last year have been unique since 1924, but bear interesting similarities to lulls in lava lake activity prior to 1924.

It is well known that, until 1924, there was a nearly continuous lake of lava in Halema`uma`u Crater, which was less than half the diameter it is today. But “nearly continuous” means there were periods when the lava lake disappeared. Mid-1913 to late 1914 was one of those periods when the crater was filled with fume, but not lava. Fortunately, regular Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reports described this lull.

In 1913, HVO was located where the Volcano House hotel is today. Lacking direct views into Halema`uma`u Crater, observers noted sounds and characteristics of the fume coming from the pit to describe its behavior.

Reports of glow were infrequent, but descriptions of noises from the crate-blowing, coughing, booming, hissing, rumbling, grumbling, puffing, and breathing-were common. Rock slides, which were frequent and audible, sometimes produced dust clouds.

“During the last three months the only marks of activity which have fluctuated have been noises of blowing and rumbling, greater or less suffocating quality to the fumes when breathed, and very rare glimpses of flame seen two or three times at night.” (HVO report, August 18, 1913).

Through September, the noises increased in intensity, and some glow was observed. Pele’s hair was frequently found downwind of the crater and, when the fumes cleared, glimpses of a lava vent deep in Halema`uma`u Crater could be seen.

By October 20, 1913, Halema`uma`u Crater was considered to be in a minor eruptive phase. The crater was emitting much greater volumes of fume than in August. Sounds resembling “swashing liquid” suggest the continued existence of a lava lake, even when it was obscured by fume. A glow-lit fume cloud was a frequent sight over the crater at night.

Activity decreased through the end of 1913, and Halema`uma`u finished the year in a “semi-dormant” state, with a crater shaped like a huge funnel about 200 m (600 ft) deep and a thickly crusted lava pool in its bottom. Vigorous lava lake activity did not resume until late 1914.

Jump ahead to 2008. HVO reports have been describing many of the same characteristics. Few views of a lava pond have been recorded, but blowing and booming sounds, rock falls, and dust plumes have been common. Explosions were common in much of 2008, and some were energetic enough to erupt material to the crater rim.

The 1913-14 lull in activity and the currently elevated summit activity both result from lava being at similar shallow depths below Halema`uma`u Crater. In the early part of 1913, lava dropped to that level. In early 2008, magma rose to a similar depth.

The 2008 activity produced small amounts of tephra, often including Pele’s hair. The 1913-14 lull also produced notable amounts of Pele’s hair, but production of other tephra was not recorded.

Throughout both events, progress is highly variable. The overall rise of lava in the crater during 1913 and 1914 was halting, with episodes of rise repeatedly cut short with episodes of subsidence. Similarly, the 2008 activity changes several times a week, with lava interpreted to be rising and falling within the conduit below the vent.

In both cases, shallow magma produced elevated SO2 emissions and glow from the vent. “Fumes continue to pour out without abatement” (HVO report, February 4, 1914). Observers commonly described the fume as being difficult to breathe in 1913. Respiratory protection is required to work in the fume emitted today but probably wasn’t necessary in earlier years.

HVO continues to monitor Kīlauea’s activities and we hope to learn more by comparing recent events with past volcanic activity.

Activity update

Kīlauea Volcano continues to be active. A vent in Halema`uma`u Crater is emitting elevated amounts of sulfur dioxide gas and producing small amounts of ash. Resulting high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in downwind air have closed the south part of Kīlauea caldera and produced occasional air quality alerts in more distant areas, such as Pahala and communities adjacent to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, during kona wind periods. A collapse deep within the vent on Wednesday, February 4 produced a robust brown plume and appeared to reopen the conduit, filled with rubble since early December. Views inside the vent the next day with a thermal camera showed a small, crusted lava pond more than 100 yards below the vent rim.

Pu`u `Ō`ō continues to produce sulfur dioxide at even higher rates than the vent in Halema`uma`u Crater. Trade winds tend to pool these emissions along the West Hawai`i coast, while Kona winds blow these emissions into communities to the north, such as Mountain View, Volcano, and Hilo.

Lava erupting from the Thanksgiving Eve Breakout (TEB) vent at the eastern base of Pu`u `Ō`ō continues to flow to the ocean at Waikupanaha through a well-established lava tube. Breakouts from a western branch of the lava tube were active on the coastal plain near the National Park boundary early in the week and also continued to feed the small ocean entry near Waha`ula. A deflation-inflation cycle beginning February 3 led to a short-term reduction in lava supply to the flow field. Surface flows and ocean entries were inactive on Thursday, February 5, and will probably resume shortly.

Be aware that active lava deltas can collapse at any time, potentially generating large explosions. This may be especially true during times of rapidly changing lava supply conditions. The Waikupanaha delta has collapsed many times over the last several months, with three of the collapses resulting in rock blasts that tossed television-sized rocks up onto the sea-cliff and threw fist-sized rocks more than 200 yards inland.

Do not approach the ocean entry or venture onto the lava deltas. Even the intervening beaches are susceptible to large waves generated during delta collapse; avoid these beaches. In addition, steam plumes rising from ocean entries are highly acidic and laced with glass particles. Call Hawai`i County Civil Defense at 961-8093 for viewing hours.

Mauna Loa is not erupting. No earthquakes were located beneath the summit this past week. Continuing extension between locations spanning the summit indicates slow inflation of the volcano, combined with slow eastward slippage of its east flank.

Three earthquakes beneath Hawai`i Island were reported felt within the past week. A magnitude-3.2 earthquake occurred at 3:37 p.m., H.s.t., on Friday, January 30, 2009, and was located 2 km (1 mile) east of Pahala at a depth of 10 km (6 miles). A magnitude-3.4 and a magnitude-3.5 earthquake occurred at 7:12 and 7:17 p.m., respectively, on the same Friday and were located 7 km (4 miles) west of Kalapana at a depth of 9 km (6 miles).

Visit our Web site (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) for daily Kīlauea eruption updates, a summary of volcanic events over the past year, and nearly real-time Hawai`i earthquake information. Kīlauea daily update summaries are also available by phone at (808) 967-8862. Questions can be emailed to askHVO@usgs.gov.

For more information on traveling to Hawaii in general and seeing the volcanoes of the Big Island in particular, please visit www.tourguidehawaii.com and www.tourguidehawaii.blogspot.com.

Reprinted from here.

Point Forecast: Kailua Kona HI
19.63°N 155.98°W (Elev. 213 ft)

Mobile Weather Information
Last Update: 6:27 am HST Feb 15, 2009
Forecast Valid: 7am HST Feb 15, 2009-6pm HST Feb 21, 2009
Forecast at a Glance
Today

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 81°F
Tonight

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Lo 66°F
Presidents’
Day

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 80°F
Monday
Night

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Lo 64°F
Tuesday

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 81°F
Tuesday
Night

Haze
Haze

Lo 66°F

Wednesday

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Hi 80°F
Wednesday
Night

Isolated Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 20%
Isolated
Showers
Lo 65°F
Thursday

Scattered Showers Chance for Measurable Precipitation 30%
Scattered
Showers
Hi 81°F
Detailed text forecast
Today: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. Light wind becoming west between 10 and 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Tonight: Isolated showers after midnight. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. East wind around 14 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Presidents’ Day: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 80. East wind 10 to 14 mph becoming west. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Monday Night: Isolated showers before midnight. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 64. East wind around 14 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Tuesday: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. East wind 9 to 14 mph becoming west. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Tuesday Night: Widespread haze. Mostly clear, with a low around 66. East wind around 13 mph.

Wednesday: Isolated showers after noon. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 80. East wind between 11 and 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Wednesday Night: Isolated showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 65. East wind around 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Thursday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. East wind 9 to 11 mph becoming west. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Thursday Night: Isolated showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. East wind around 11 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Friday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. East wind 8 to 11 mph becoming west. Chance of precipitation is 30%.

Friday Night: Isolated showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. East wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Saturday: Scattered showers. Widespread haze. Partly cloudy, with a high near 81. East wind around 8 mph becoming west. Chance of precipitation is 30%.